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Hoops Recruiting Site

R.J. Griffin is one of six players from his seven-man Dartmouth College basketball recruiting class to have left the program. (Courtesy Dartmouth Sports Information).

R.J. Griffin is one of six players from his seven-man Dartmouth College basketball recruiting class to have left the program. (Courtesy Dartmouth Sports Information).

I will be perfectly honest: I dislike college recruiting “news”. I put the word in quotes because while there is some genuine news on the topic, there’s also a whole lot of white noise.

Player X is looking at schools A, B and C. He’s a 4-star recruit according to one recruting website, but only a 2-star according to one of its rivals. Player B was a 2-star recruit before school Z showed interest in him and now, overnight, he’s a 4-star prospect. And did you hear that his mother and his dog are in favor of him going to school Q?

Oy vey. Always with the recruiting. It makes my head hurt and its accuracy is often suspect.

The one time I bit on such an item, hook, line and sinker, I regretted it deeply. Touted quarterback Cole Marcoux came to Dartmouth with all kinds of hype, plenty of it generated by my own writing. It turned out, however, that Marcoux was overmatched under center and he developed a nasty hitch in his throwing motion that led to a switch to tight end.

Last fall, as a senior, he was outstanding and it was great to see him shed some of the baggage that had accumulated because outsiders had loaded him up with such expectations.

Not to say that we won’t again write about notable Dartmouth recruits, here and there, but the Marcoux case has made me wary.

Having said all that, here’s a recruiting page that’s rather intriguing. It professes to show who the Big Green men’s basketball program is targeting among various prospects. More interesting to me, however, was the shocking number of current juniors and seniors to quit the team.

One senior, Tyler Melville, remains out of the seven players brought into the program during his freshman year. Only two juniors, John Golden and Gabas Maldunas, remain from their six-man class. All seven sophomores have stuck around so far.

Whatever the reasons, going 3-of-13 in recruiting over two years isn’t any way to rebuild a program.