Bulls Clear Cap Space to Sign Gasol

FILE - In this March 21, 2001, file photo, Red Klotz, 80, owner of full-time Globetrotters' opponent the New York Nationals, smiles inside his office at his home in Margate, N.J. The basketball barnstormer who owned the Washington Generals and other teams that lost thousands of games to the Harlem Globetrotters died Monday, July 14, 2014. Louis "Red" Klotz was 93. (AP Photo/Chris Polk, File)

FILE - In this March 21, 2001, file photo, Red Klotz, 80, owner of full-time Globetrotters' opponent the New York Nationals, smiles inside his office at his home in Margate, N.J. The basketball barnstormer who owned the Washington Generals and other teams that lost thousands of games to the Harlem Globetrotters died Monday, July 14, 2014. Louis "Red" Klotz was 93. (AP Photo/Chris Polk, File)

Chicago — The Chicago Bulls made two trades Monday to clear salary-cap space, setting the stage for the addition of free-agent center Pau Gasol.

The Bulls sent forward Anthony Randolph, two second-round draft picks and cash considerations to Orlando for the rights to Milovan Rakovic. They also traded forward Greg Smith to Dallas for the rights to Tadija Dragicevic.

The 6-foot-11 Randolph was acquired in a draft-night trade with Denver that gave the Bulls the rights to high-scoring Creighton forward Doug McDermott. The journeyman has played for Golden State, New York, Minnesota and Denver in six seasons in the NBA, averaging 7.1 points and 4.3 rebounds.

The pair of moves helps make room for Gasol, who announced over the weekend he planned to join the Bulls. The 7-0 Gasol is a four-time All-Star and averaged 17.4 points and 9.7 rebounds in 60 games last season with Los Angeles.

Magic Adds Shooter

Orlando, Fla. — The Orlando Magic have completed their biggest free agency acquisition this summer with the signing of veteran Channing Frye.

Frye agreed to a four-year, $32 million deal last week, but officially signed with the Magic on Monday. Along with the signing of veteran Ben Gordon last week, the addition injects a veteran presence back into a locker room that lost Jameer Nelson and Arron Afflalo.

Washington Generals Owner Dies

Margate, n.j. — The basketball barnstormer who owned the Washington Generals and other teams that lost thousands of games to the Harlem Globetrotters has died. Louis “Red” Klotz was 93.

The Press of Atlantic City reports Klotz died in his sleep Saturday at his home in Margate.

Klotz formed a working relationship with the Globetrotters in 1952, putting together the opposing teams that almost always lost. In 1971, he hit the game-winner in a rare Globetrotter loss as a 50-year-old player/coach.

In a statement posted on the Globetrotters website, team CEO Kurt Schneider said Klotz helped bring basketball and smiles to fans worldwide. He says Klotz was “a legend and a global treasure.”

NFL Football

Browns Owner, Brother Fined

Nashville, Tenn. — The truck-stop company owned by Cleveland Browns owner Jimmy Haslam and Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has agreed to pay a $92 million penalty for cheating customers out of promised rebates and discounts, authorities announced Monday.

In an agreement with the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Tennessee, Pilot Flying J has accepted responsibility for the criminal conduct of its employees, 10 of whom have pleaded guilty to participating in the scheme.

For its part, the government has agreed not to prosecute the nation’s largest diesel retailer as long as Pilot abides by the agreement.

Among other conditions, Pilot has agreed to cooperate with an ongoing investigation of current and former employees. The agreement does not protect any individual at Pilot from prosecution.

The agreement was signed by U.S. Attorney Bill Killian on Thursday and attorneys for Knoxville-based Pilot on Friday.

Nashville criminal defense attorney and former prosecutor David Raybin, who has followed the case but is not involved, said the agreement most likely signals that Pilot CEO Jimmy Haslam will not face charges.

“No prosecutor would enter into an agreement like this, ask for this kind of sanction, unless they didn’t have enough evidence to indict Haslam,” he said. “Also, Pilot would not agree to pay unless they felt the government would not prosecute him.”

FBI special agent Robert H. Root said in an affidavit filed in federal court last year that the scheme was known by a variety of euphemisms including “manual rebates.” Sales team members would make reduce the amount of money due to trucking company customers they deemed to be too unsophisticated to notice, according to the affidavit.

The scheme was widely known in the sales department, according to court documents, with supervisors teaching other employees how to do it.

Court records said the scheme lasted from at least 2007 until an FBI raid in April 2013.

Jimmy Haslam has said he was unaware of the scheme. Through a spokesman, he declined an interview on Monday, but issued a statement: “We, as a company, look forward to putting this whole unfortunate episode behind us, continuing our efforts to rectify the damage done, regaining our customers’ trust, and getting on with our business.”

Gov. Bill Haslam holds an undisclosed ownership share in the company but has said he is not involved in Pilot’s day-to-day operations. Pilot has annual revenues of around $30 billion.

In May, several top executives abruptly left the company. Pilot officials have not said why the employees left, but the agreement with prosecutors acknowledges that the company has terminated or placed on leave employees who violated company policies. It also acknowledges that Pilot acted quickly to investigate problems with the rebate program and repay cheated customers with interest.

Pilot agreed in November to pay out nearly $85 million to settle claims related to the fraudulent withholding of fuel rebates and discounts in a class-action lawsuit with 5,500 trucking companies. Several companies have filed separate lawsuits against Pilot that are ongoing.

AP-RUN-Obit-Olympian-Alice-Coachman-Davis,497

First black woman to win Olympic gold dies in Ga.

AP Photo NY154, NY153, NY152

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Associated Press

ALBANY, Ga. — The first black woman to win an Olympic gold medal, Alice Coachman Davis, died early Monday in south Georgia. She was 90.

Davis’ death was confirmed by her daughter, Evelyn Jones.

Davis won Olympic gold in the high jump at the 1948 games in London with an American and Olympic record of 1.68 meters (5.51 feet), according to USA Track and Field, the American governing body of the sport. Davis was inducted to the USA Track and Field Hall of fame in 1975, and was inducted to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 2004.

“Going into the USOC Hall of Fame is as good as it gets,” she told The Associated Press in a 2004 interview. “It’s like Cooperstown, Springfield and Canton,” she said, referring to the sites of other prominent Halls of Fame.

Davis was the only American woman to win a gold medal at the 1948 games. According to Olympic historian David Wallechinsky, Coachman was honored with a 175-mile motorcade in Georgia when she returned from London. However, the black and white audiences were segregated at her official ceremony in Albany.

Recollecting her career in the 2004 interview, Davis speculated that she could have won even more Olympic medals, but the Olympics weren’t held in 1940 or 1944 because of World War II. She retired at age 25 after winning the gold medal in London.

“I know I would have won in 1944, at least,” said Davis. “I was starting to peak then. It really feels good when Old Glory is raised and the National Anthem is played.”

Davis attended Tuskegee University and also played basketball on a team that won three straight conference basketball titles. She won 25 national track and field championships — including 10 consecutive high jump titles — between 1939 and 1948, according to USA Track and Field.

Growing up in the deep South during the era of segregation, Davis had to overcome multiple challenges.

The New Georgia Encyclopedia says she was prohibited from using public sports facilities because of her race, so she used whatever equipment she could cobble together to practice her jumping.

“My dad did not want me to travel to Tuskegee and then up north to the Nationals,” Davis told the AP. “He felt it was too dangerous. Life was very different for African-Americans at that time. But I came back and showed him my medal and talked about all the things I saw. He and my mom were very proud of me.”

Davis won her first national high jump title at age 16 according to USA Track and Field, and worked as a school teacher and track coach after retiring. An elementary school in her home town is named in her honor and opened in August 1999 according to Dougherty County schools officials.

Vera Williams, a secretary at Meadows Funeral Home in Albany, said Meadows will be handling Davis’ memorial service, but plans haven’t been finalized yet. Davis’ cause of death was not immediately disclosed.