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Local & Regional Briefs for Tuesday, Jan. 29

The Snowshoe Farm booth houses two alpacas at the 82nd annual Vermont Farm Show kicks off at the Champlain Valley Expo in Essex Jct., Vt., on Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014. (AP Photo/Andy Duback)

The Snowshoe Farm booth houses two alpacas at the 82nd annual Vermont Farm Show kicks off at the Champlain Valley Expo in Essex Jct., Vt., on Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014. (AP Photo/Andy Duback)

Small Earthquake Rattles Haverhill

Haverhill — A mild earthquake rumbled through Haverhill and surrounding towns for several seconds Tuesday morning, causing no apparent injuries or damage to property or infrastructure — and speeding the wake-up routine for some residents preparing for work and school.

The temblor, measuring 2.3 on the Richter scale, occurred shortly after 6:30 a.m., six miles underground between North Haverhill and Woodsville, Haverhill Police Chief Byron Charles said in a news release.

“The Department of Homeland Security has been in direct contact with the Police Department and is monitoring the situation,” Haverhill Police Chief Byron Charles said in a news release.

Julie McIntyre, of Monroe, and Michele Clark, of North Haverhill, were preparing for their daily commutes to Dartmouth College, when the quake hit.

“I heard the rumble and felt the shaking,” said McIntyre, who works at Dartmouth College’s Baker Library. “I was afraid there was something wrong with my furnace. I was blow-drying my hair and went over and turned off the fan because I wasn’t sure what was really happening, as it seemed like it was more than a furnace malfunction. By then all was quiet.”

Clark was wondering what had happened, until McIntyre alerted her later in the morning.

“I looked at the garage because I’d started my car with the garage door down,” said Clark, who works in the development office for the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. “I looked to see if something exploded in the garage and if it was on fire.”

A number of residents called the Haverhill police station in the wake of the quake, Town Manager Glenn English said.

“I was up, but I did not feel it for some reason,” English said. “I know my neighbor did, though.”

Longtime Montshire Museum Director to Retire

Norwich — David Goudy, the executive director of the Montshire Museum for the past 33 years, plans to retire in March 2015, the Norwich museum said Tuesday.

Early in his tenure in 1981, Goudy oversaw the acquisition of the 100-acre site along the Connecticut River where the museum eventually moved in 1989. It was previously based at an old bowling alley in Hanover.

Goudy was a recipient of the first annual New Hampshire Corporate Fund Award for Excellence in Nonprofit Management, and attended a White House reception during the Clinton administration when the Montshire was the first recipient of the National Award for Museum Service.

The Montshire had almost 150,000 visitors in 2013, including more than 20,000 students, the museum said.

The Montshire’s Board of Trustees has hired the search firm Kittleman & Associates, which specializes in museum leadership and nonprofits, to search for a successor.

Former Vt. Principal Pleads Not Guilty to Theft

Bennington, Vt. (ap) — A former elementary school principal in Vermont has pleaded not guilty to embezzlement charges accusing him of diverting $4,000 in grant money to his personal use and taking students’ lunch money.

Michael Heller of Fairfax had been principal of Readsboro Elementary School for two years.

Police said they were contacted by interim superintendent Richard McClements on Dec. 19, 2013, after a five-week investigation about a “Principal’s Account” that wasn’t authorized.

Police also spoke to school Secretary Patricia Kidney, who said about $200 in lunch money dropped off at her desk went missing over the course of a year.

David Silver, Heller’s attorney, said his client admitted to misusing the grant funds and forging invoices because he suffers from health problems, as does his mother, and to pay off $1,500 in outstanding motor vehicle fines his mother had incurred, the Bennington Banner reported. But Heller has denied taking any lunch money.

He said he planned to repay the money through a lawn care business he would run this summer.

— Staff and wire reports