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Three-Hour Claremont Standoff Ends Peacefully After Parolee Surrenders

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  • Retired Deputy Police Chief Bill Wilmot, who still works occasionally for the Claremont Police Department, stands on the steps of a home on Providence Street in Claremont following a standoff with Anthony Jarvis Jr. (Valley News - Sarah Priestap)

    Retired Deputy Police Chief Bill Wilmot, who still works occasionally for the Claremont Police Department, stands on the steps of a home on Providence Street in Claremont following a standoff with Anthony Jarvis Jr. (Valley News - Sarah Priestap) Purchase photo reprints »

  • Anthony Jarvis Jr., left, his wife, Angel, and son, Bryce, 4, during a 2008 memorial service for Jarvis’ father, Anthony, who was killed during a standoff with police. (Valley News - Jason Johns)

    Anthony Jarvis Jr., left, his wife, Angel, and son, Bryce, 4, during a 2008 memorial service for Jarvis’ father, Anthony, who was killed during a standoff with police. (Valley News - Jason Johns) Purchase photo reprints »

  • Retired Deputy Police Chief Bill Wilmot, who still works occasionally for the Claremont Police Department, stands on the steps of a home on Providence Street in Claremont following a standoff with Anthony Jarvis Jr. (Valley News - Sarah Priestap)
  • Anthony Jarvis Jr., left, his wife, Angel, and son, Bryce, 4, during a 2008 memorial service for Jarvis’ father, Anthony, who was killed during a standoff with police. (Valley News - Jason Johns)

A convicted felon whose father was killed in a police standoff in 2008 surrendered peacefully to law enforcement yesterday after a three-hour standoff at his home on Providence Avenue.

Police Chief Alex Scott said in a news release last night that Anthony Jarvis Jr., 33, came out of his home around 3 p.m. and complied with police orders.

“He was taken into custody without incident,” Scott said.

According to the release, Jarvis has not been charged in connection with the standoff but is being held on a “parole detainer” at the Sullivan County House of Corrections in Unity. Scott said the matter remains under investigation.

Police went to the residence at noon to assist the state Department of Corrections Probation and Parole Department with a parole search.

“During this search, the parolee fled into his residence, locking the door behind him and after doing so, made threatening statements about doing violence to himself with a firearm,” Scott wrote.

Police quickly retreated and called for backup. State Police, the Sullivan County sheriff’s department and additional Claremont officers responded and the State Police’s Special Weapons and Tactics Team was put on standby. Nearby homes were evacuated and a command post was established.

“Officers on the scene were able to make cell phone contact with the parolee through a family member,” the release said. “At about (3 p.m.) the parolee agreed to come out of the house peacefully.”

Scott said police have not determined whether Jarvis was armed or whether anyone else was in the home during the standoff.

Next-door neighbor Lorie Waterman said she thought police overreacted.

“They make Tony out to be the bad guy here,” Waterman said. “He is a decent guy trying to make his life better. He loves his kids and is great with his family. I thought what they did was ridiculous.”

Yesterday’s incident ended much differently than the July 2008 standoff between Jarvis’ father, Anthony, and the Western New Hampshire Special Operations Unit. The SOU was summoned to help police arrest Jesse Jarvis, Jarvis Jr.’s brother. Police ultimately arrested him without incident, but the elder Jarvis, who was armed and intoxicated, barricaded himself inside a trailer on the property and threatened to shoot anyone who entered.

In an operation that would later be scrutinized by the New Hampshire Attorney General’s Office, State Police Trooper Philip Gaiser entered the camper. Jarvis fired several rounds from his 9mm handgun, hitting Gaiser in the leg and finger. Gaiser returned fire, killing Anthony Jarvis.

During his father’s funeral in Claremont, Jarvis Jr. told the Valley News that he bore no ill will toward police.

“I’m not angry. I’m just trying to have peace with my dad,” Jarvis said. “I’m focused on saying bye. Everyone deals with things in their own way. I hope they were doing their job. I don’t have nothing against cops. I try not to hate.”

In November 2009, Jarvis Jr. was sentenced to roughly three years in prison for an incident in which he fired a shotgun into an occupied pick-up truck in downtown Claremont and then engaged in a brief high speed chase.

He was released from New Hampshire State Prison in May 2012 and sent to a halfway house, the New Hampshire Department of Corrections said yesterday. In September, he was released from custody and allowed to move home. He was being supervised by probation officers based in Claremont, the DOC said.

During the sentencing hearing in 2009, lawyers said that Jarvis Jr. had long struggled with alcohol and drug abuse, and struggled further when his father died.

Jarvis had previously been convicted of seven crimes, including resisting arrest and reckless conduct with a deadly weapon, between 1998 and 2001, Sullivan County Attorney Marc Hathaway said during the 2009 sentencing hearing.

Valley News Staff Writer Mark C. Davis contributed to this report.

CORRECTION

Anthony Jarvis Jr., the Claremont man detained last week after a standoff with Claremont police, is 33. An earlier version of this story gave an incorrect age.

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