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‘The Way It Ought to Be’: Hanover Man Honors Traditions of Hunting

  • Carl Diener, of Hanover, N.H., quietly walks into the woods near his home while looking for deer tracks on the second to last day of New Hampshire's muzzleloader season on Nov. 6, 2017. Diener began hunting in the 1980s with a CRREL co-worker and was attracted to muzzleloader season because it's a two-week head start on rifle season. (Valley News - Geoff Hansen) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

  • Carl Diener, of Hanover, N.H., takes aim at a doe he sees nearby -- but does not shoot -- while hunting on the second to last day of New Hampshire's muzzleloader season on Nov. 6, 2017. During muzzleloader season, the state allows the taking of any deer only for the first four days in the G1 Wildlife Management Unit where Diener hunts. (Valley News - Geoff Hansen) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

  • A collection of photographs in Carl Diener's shop in Hanover, N.H., shows the deer he has harvested over the years with his muzzleloader rifle. Once rifle season begins, Diener will not use a modern gun, dressing in his wool capote coat, carrying his powder in a horn and ammunition in a pouch. (Valley News - Geoff Hansen) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

  • Rain drops gather on the barrel of Carl Diener's .75-caliber muzzleloader rifle while Diener hunts near his Hanover, N.H., home on a rainy afternoon on Nov. 6, 2017. Diener built the gun from a kit about 30 years ago. (Valley News - Geoff Hansen) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

  • Stepping in from a rainy afternoon of hunting, Carl Diener, of Hanover, N.H., checks to be sure the flintlock's priming pan is dry where gunpowder was to be struck in his muzzleloader rifle on Nov. 6, 2017. Diener had covered the area with a cow's knee, originally named for the piece of leather made from the appendage. Diener made one himself from two pieces of suede. (Valley News - Geoff Hansen) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

  • Carl Diener, of Hanover, N.H., is bundled up from the rain in a wool capote and hood he made himself while hunting on the second to last day of New Hampshire's muzzleloader season on Nov. 6, 2017. When their son was younger, Diener's whole family also took part in historical reenactments. "I should have been born about 250 years ago," he said. (Valley News - Geoff Hansen) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

  • Carl Diener, of Hanover, N.H., quietly steps into the woods near his home while looking for a place to spend the afternoon hunting deer on the second to last day of New Hampshire's muzzleloader season on Nov. 6, 2017. "I like the old way of doing things," he said. "You feel like you're actually accomplishing something." (Valley News - Geoff Hansen) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.



STORY BY LIZ SAUCHELLI
Saturday, November 11, 2017

Hanover — Carl Diener has a view of hunting that might be out of the mainstream.

“I have a different philosophy about hunting than a lot of modern hunters do, I guess,” the Hanover resident said. “I don’t really care for the commercialism of it. It’s a spiritual experience.”

In that vein, during muzzleloader season, Diener hunts with a flintlock. He made his own powder horn and clothes, and casts his own lead shot.

“I feel like I’m actually part of the process instead of buying everything,” he said. “It makes it more real.”

Diener, 62, author of the book Revelation from Creation — True Tales from the North Woods, credits his interest, in part, to the time he and his wife spent as 18th century historical re-enactors.

“You learn how to pour powder and shot, and how to load a muzzleloader, what’s the idiosyncrasies of a flintlock ignition system,” he said. “You learn little historical facts that people tend to forget over the years.”

While Deiner acknowledges that every time period in history has had difficulties, it seems like the country was better back then.

“To me it was a more (pure) era,” he said. “You run into hunters in the woods (today) and they look like they’ve stepped out of a Cabela’s catalog.”

He is particularly in agreement with the way Native Americans view taking the life of an animal as “a sacred thing,” he said, in line with his belief as a Christian that the animals come as a gift from God.

“I’m part of life. The way it ought to be,” Diener said. “Not some cellophane-wrap, buy-at-a-store type of thing.”

And his love of tradition extends to his home business of repairing and restoring clocks.

“It’s back to the traditional, the way it should be,” Diener said. “I just have a fascination with that.”

Geoff Hansen can be reached at ghansen@vnews.com. Liz Sauchelli can be reached at esauchelli@vnews.com