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Celtics’ offseason focused on future

  • Boston Celtics' Jayson Tatum (0) and Miami Heat's Jimmy Butler (22) battle for a rebound during the second half of an NBA conference final playoff basketball game Sunday, Sept. 27, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) ap — Mark J. Terrill

  • Miami Heat's Bam Adebayo, right, hugs Boston Celtics' Kemba Walker (8) as Miami Heat head coach Erik Spoelstra, top left, greets Boston Celtics head coach Brad Stevens after the Heat's win over the Celtics in an NBA conference final playoff basketball game Sunday, Sept. 27, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) Mark J. Terrill

  • Boston Celtics head coach Brad Stevens yells to his players during the second half of an NBA conference final playoff basketball game against the Miami Heat Friday, Sept. 25, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) Mark J. Terrill

AP Sports Writer
Published: 9/28/2020 9:01:51 PM
Modified: 9/28/2020 9:01:47 PM

BOSTON — Jayson Tatum emerged as a bona fide star, Jaylen Brown showed he can be a consistent presence in the lineup and Kemba Walker helped the Celtics put the failed Kyrie Irving experiment behind them.

But following their Eastern Conference finals loss to Miami, it’s clear there is still work to do in Boston after the Celtics squandered their best opportunity yet under coach Brad Stevens to make it to the NBA Finals.

Stevens said he heads into the offseason lamenting only the outcome and not the effort by his players during the abnormal season.

“My regret is not what we put in. My regret is not how we prepared or worked or how hard our guys worked or how committed they were to playing and staying together,” he said. “You look back at those first couple of games (against Miami) and it put us in a tough spot. I just think that ultimately we had our chances and we didn’t take advantage of it enough.”

The Celtics returned from the COVID-19-caused hiatus and emerged as one of the hottest teams in the Florida bubble, winning five of their eight seeding games entering the playoffs.

They then swept the Philadelphia 76ers in the first round and held off the defending champion Toronto Raptors in seven games to advance to the conference finals — all without Gordon Hayward.

Despite big efforts from Tatum, Brown and Walker, who all averaged 20 or more points per game in the playoffs, Hayward’s absence was felt in the back-to-back losses to open the series against the Heat, as the Celtics struggled to score against Miami’s athletic front line.

That combined with uncharacteristic lapses in defense contributed to them being unable to close out games in the 4-2 series loss.

But unlike in previous seasons, the issues were situational and don’t seem to be systemic. That’s something to build on for a team expected to remain a contender in the East next season.

“We got to use this fuel to fuel us to come back stronger, better, mentally, physically, emotionally, psychologically, all of it,” Marcus Smart said. “We’ve got to use it to our advantage to come back. It’s over. We can’t change the past. We can only get ready for the future.”




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