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New Species of Tick Found in New Hampshire

  • Asian longhorned tick. James Gathany—Centers for Disease Control

Concord Monitor
Published: 11/6/2018 12:21:58 AM
Modified: 11/6/2018 12:22:05 AM

Just what New Hampshire needs: A new species of tick has arrived.

The species is called Asian longhorned tick, although to the casual eye, it doesn’t seem to have any horns. It is the first new tick species found in the U.S. in half a century. It has been found in nine states along the Eastern seaboard.

In Asia, it is known to transmit a number of diseases, but according to reports it rarely bites humans. None of the Asian longhorned ticks found in this country have carried any human diseases. As a result, the tick is considered mostly a threat to livestock.

According to the state veterinarian, the tick was spotted in this state on a dog visiting from New York by “a particularly observant New Hampshire resident.”

“This is the first time the pest has been found in N.H., but it may be limited to the visiting dog,” officials said in a news release announcing the discovery.

Retrospective studies indicate the tick has been present in the United States since at least 2010.

Female longhorned ticks don’t need a male to reproduce. They can spawn asexually via a process known as parthenogenesis. After feeding, a single female can lay about 2,000 eggs.

Any unusual ticks should be submitted for identification through either a veterinarian or physician to the N.H. Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food using an online form at agriculture.nh.gov.

“This tick already appears to be established in the environment in a number of states, so eradication from the U.S. is unlikely,” said Steve Crawford, N.H. State Veterinarian. “We are asking everyone to not only protect themselves from tick bites but to pay close attention to their animals as possible transporters of this tick, or any other, into New Hampshire.”


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