Please support the Valley News during the COVID-19 pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought the local economy — and many of the advertisers who support our work — to a near standstill. During this unprecedented challenge, we continue to make our coronavirus coverage free to everyone at www.vnews.com/coronavirus because we feel our most critical mission is to deliver vital information to our communities.

If you believe local news is essential, especially during this crisis, we are asking for your support. Please consider subscribing or making a donation today. Learn more at the links below.

Thank you for your support of the Valley News.

Dan McClory, publisher


English teacher at state prison is New Hampshire Teacher of the Year

  • Kimberly Piper-Stoddard leads her class at the New Hampshire Women’s Prison in Concord in May. On Wednesday, she was named the New Hampshire Teacher of the Year for 2020.

  • Kimberly Piper leads her class at the New Hampshire Women’s Prison in Concord in May. On Wednesday, she was named the New Hampshire Teacher of the Year.

  • Kimberly Piper leads her class at the New Hampshire Women’s Prison in Concord in May. On Wednesday, she was named the New Hampshire Teacher of the Year.

Published: 10/10/2019 10:12:43 PM
Modified: 10/10/2019 10:12:32 PM

CONCORD — Kimberly Piper-Stoddard, an English teacher for inmates at the state prison in Concord, has been named New Hampshire’s 2020 Teacher of the Year, the first time that award has gone to an educator at what is known as Granite State High School.

Piper-Stoddard becomes the state nominee for National Teacher of the Year and will represent New Hampshire at several events throughout the year.

Piper-Stoddard spent the majority of her career teaching middle schoolers until four years ago, when after looking for a change, she saw an ad for an English teacher at Granite State High School, inside a micro district called the Corrections Special School District, which operates within the prison walls. Since then she has taught at both the men’s and women’s prisons in Concord, as well as the Northern New Hampshire Correctional Facility in Berlin.

The high school is fully accredited and recognized by the state Department of Education, giving inmates an opportunity to earn a high school diploma. Those who have already completed high school can take classes as well.

In May, Piper-Stoddard described to the Concord Monitor some of the difficulties of teaching in a prison, where security is paramount, the internet is not available, and inmates might suddenly leave class when their sentence is finished.

Despite those challenges, she said, the classes are fun because the students, who can range in age from 18 to 70, are engaged.

“They might not be excited to be in prison, but they’re choosing to come to school,” she told the Monitor. “Whether it’s learning disabilities or home life, whatever may be impacting their ability to succeed at school, these men and women here have figured it out and put it together — with our help, but largely it’s their determination to decide to do it. We’re just here to help them along the way. That’s really powerful for me.”

Piper-Stoddard was surprised by the Teacher of the Year announcement during a ceremony at the State Prison for Men.

New Hampshire Teacher of the Year finalists were Jeremy Brown of Littleton High School; Sarah Grossi, Con-Val Regional High School; John “Drew” Groves of Bow High School; Barbara Milliken of Oyster River High School; and Christine Stilwell of Robert J. Lister Academy.




Valley News

24 Interchange Drive
West Lebanon, NH 03784
603-298-8711

 

© 2019 Valley News
Terms & Conditions - Privacy Policy