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Volunteer Spotlight: Scores of volunteers help family into new home

  • Volunteers help build an Upper Valley Habitat for Humanity in Sharon. The nonprofit organization needs volunteers to help complete the home, as well as for an upcoming project in Lebanon. (Upper Valley Habitat for Humanity photograph)



Valley News Correspondent
Saturday, May 11, 2019

SHARON — Over more than 10 months, 146 volunteers from the Upper Valley and beyond have helped build a Habitat for Humanity house in Sharon that will soon be home to Zack and Mindy Cayer and their three children.

Still, new volunteers are needed to help finish off the home so the family can move in by the end of the month, and to help on an upcoming build in Lebanon.

“Volunteers get the opportunity to learn construction skills and meet the partner family as they work alongside one another, meet other people from the community or volunteer with a group of their friends or colleagues, and take heart in knowing they are helping make the dream of homeownership a reality for a family,” said Eva Loomis, office manager and family coordinator for Upper Valley Habitat for Humanity.

Volunteers don’t need any construction experience (although skilled labor is always welcome). In addition to on-site help, volunteers can support laborers by delivering food and drinks to the site or helping the family navigate the logistics of home ownership.

“By the end, the family feels like a part of the community as they embark as homeowners,” Loomis said.

On the Sharon build, dedicated volunteers have helped construct the house. Rick Biddle holds the most hours on site, with 148, while Stephen Raymond has contributed to the effort on 33 different days. While these volunteers are outstanding, Habitat for Humanity also welcomes people who are available for smaller time commitments, Loomis said.

Volunteer Shari Sacks couples her love for baking the with the Habitat mission by delivering sandwiches and baked goods to work crews.

“It’s a very important program, and housing is really expensive and options are limited,” Sacks said of Habitat.

Loomis said Habitat for Humanity is currently taking volunteers for a variety of roles.

“There are lots of ways to get involved, be it on our board of directors, a committee, helping with events, swinging a hammer on the construction site, or providing a lunch to the construction volunteers,” she said. “We always welcome new volunteers and only require that they have a willingness to learn.”

For more information on Upper Valley Habitat for Humanity and volunteering for the organization, visit uppervalleyhabitat.org, sign up to volunteer online at https://volunteerup.com/Login.asp?w=i&o=333, or email Loomis at office@uppervalleyhabitat.org.