‘We’re Just People’: The Faces of Gender Identity

  • Anne Beon, 67, at her home on Tuesday, May 23, 2017, in Charlestown, N.H. (Valley News - Jovelle Tamayo) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com. Anne Beon, 67, Charlestown, N.H. she/her Anne Beon, 67, is a vintage car enthusiast and a former field technician, actress, and host of “Annie’s Place,” her own television show. “Even if the laws are on your side, it’s a matter of person-to-person. And that’s why we have to be out there everyday, living our lives as real people. We’re just people,” said Beon, who experienced workplace discrimination for being transgender and homelessness after coming out. She later opened her home to other transgender women who needed support.

  • Jennica Guy, 17, left, gets ready for Hartford High School's prom with her date Charlotte Dennison, of Hanover, on Saturday, May 20, 2017, at Guy’s home in White River Junction, Vt. (Valley News - Jovelle Tamayo) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com. Jennica Guy, 17, Hartford, Vt. she/her/they/them Hartford, Vt. Jennica Guy, 17, is a student at Hartford High School who identifies as non-binary. “Don’t think that everyone who identifies as non-binary is confused,” Guy said. “I’ve been told I’m confused in my gender identity but I’m not. That’s who I am.”

  • Olivia Lhundup-Zebo, 15, on Thursday, May 18, 2017, at Howe Library in Hanover, N.H. (Valley News - Jovelle Tamayo) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com. Olivia Lhundup-Zebo, 15, Hanover, N.H. No pronoun preference Olivia Lhundup-Zebo said, “A lot of people are very uncomfortable with people either switching genders, being both genders or being ambiguous. Ambiguity is most scary for people because they need to know: ‘Are you a boy or are you a girl?’ But why do you need to know? Are you going to treat me differently?”

  • Kai Darrow, 17, at the Junction, Listen's Teen Center, on Monday, May 15, 2017, in White River Junction, Vt. (Valley News - Jovelle Tamayo) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com. Kai Darrow, 17, Hanover, N.H. they/them/she/her Kai Darrow, 17, is graduating early from Hanover High School to attend St. John’s College. “When you’re trans, it takes your youth away from you, ” she said. “You come from the high school experience — with prom and parties — to having to worry about your health. What happens if the Affordable Care Act gets repealed? It really rips you out from your youth and jolts you into adulthood.”

  • Tony Strat, 26, at Main Street Museum on Monday, May 8, 2017, in White River Junction, Vt. (Valley News - Jovelle Tamayo) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com. Tony Strat, 26, Hartford, Vt. he/him Tony Strat, an accountant and the founder of ETHK, an inclusive skateboard company said, “Everyone deserves the right to their own identity. Everyone deserves to express their identity in any way shape or form, because it makes them free, and makes them feel connected to who they truly are. Not feeling safe but feeling like yourself is a trade off. I’m coming out and being openly trans, while I could have been trans and hiding myself in a beautiful female body while feeling safe. You’re trading off your safety for your identity.”

  • Arcade Bosco, 19, on Friday, May 5, 2017, in Claremont, N.H. (Valley News - Jovelle Tamayo) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.Arcade Bosco, 19, Acworth, N.H.he/himArcade Bosco, 19, an artist from Acworth, N.H., recently co-founded the Claremont Trans Support Group. “It’s OK to have different experiences,” he said. “There’s no model trans person. There’s no definitive in anything, especially when you’re experimenting with gender or learning more about yourself.”

  • A doodle by Arcade Bosco for his therapist, depicting his feelings on his gender identity on Friday, May 5, 2017, in Claremont, N.H. (Valley News - Jovelle Tamayo) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

  • Joshua Lambert, right, at home with his wife, Paige, on Sunday, March 12, 2017, in Claremont, N.H. (Valley News - Jovelle Tamayo) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com. Joshua Lambert, 25, Claremont, N.H. he/him Joshua Lambert, an author and activist who grew up in Claremont, N.H., plans to run for a New Hampshire state representative position in the coming years. “We’re not sick. A lot of us have underlying mental health issues because of how we grew up and because of feelings of not fitting in. But being trans isn’t a sickness. It’s not unnatural. We’re just regular people,” he said. Valley News photographs — Jovelle Tamayo

  • Caitlin Cavanaugh, 21, left, and their father, Neil Pierce Allen, 45, on Wednesday, May 24, 2017, in Charlestown, N.H. (Valley News - Jovelle Tamayo) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com. Neil Pierce Allen, 45, Charlestown, N.H. He/him Neil Pierce Allen, 45, is an author and the creator of Trans NH Magazine. “I am who I am as a person. I have the same morals. I have the same obligations. I’m still raising a child. I’m still paying rent,” said Allen, who came out as transgender two years ago after his child, Caitlin, came out as transgender. “I’m just me but with different pronouns. Nothing substantial has changed. We’re all who were before, just happier.” Caitlin Cavanaugh, 21, Charlestown, N.H. They/them Caitlin Cavanaugh, 21, is the child of Neil Pierce Allen and a recent graduate of Keene State College. “Read what transgender people say about themselves. What a trans person wrote is different from what someone else wrote about them. Do your research and come to your own conclusions,” said Cavanaugh, who wore an “Everyone in my family is trans!” shirt at the recent Keene State College Pride Parade.

Published: 5/28/2017 12:38:53 AM
Modified: 5/30/2017 12:02:49 PM

Photographs and interviews by Jovelle Tamayo.

Resources

Trans NH Magazine, an online magazine for transgender and gender nonconforming individuals in New Hampshire: transnhmagazine.com

The Junction Youth Center at Listen: http://www.listencommunityservices.org/junction/

Rural Outright: facebook.com/RuralNHOutright

Trevor Project: thetrevorproject.org A national, toll-free suicide hotline for LGBTQ youth: 1-866-488-7386

Caring Adults Peer Support, for adults raising or support an LGBTQ+ child of any age. 1st and 3rd Saturdays at 10 a.m. at TLC Family Resource Center in Claremont.

Upper Valley Gender Group, every other Wednesday at 6 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the Upper Valley in Norwich, upper.valley.gender.group@gmail.com

Transgender New Hampshire: tg-nh.org

Pride Center of Vermont: pridecentervt.org

Outright Vermont: outrightvt.org

It Gets Better Project: itgetsbetter.org




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