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Residents to Move Into White River Junction Assisted Living Facility

  • A view of Gates Street and Currier Street is seen from a lounge room at The Village at White River Junction in White River Junction, Vt., on Monday, Jan. 14, 2019. The first resident is arriving on Thursday after a series of setbacks for the assisted living and memory care facility. (Valley News - Joseph Ressler) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com. Joseph Ressler

  • The room for the first resident to move in is prepared at the Village at White River Junction in White River Junction, Vt., on Monday, Jan. 14, 2019. (Valley News - Joseph Ressler) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com. Joseph Ressler

  • Employees of The Village at White River Junction prepare for the first resident to move in on Thursday in White River Junction, Vt., on Monday, Jan. 14, 2019. (Valley News - Joseph Ressler) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com. Valley News — Joseph Ressler

Valley News Staff Writer
Published: 1/14/2019 10:39:38 PM
Modified: 1/15/2019 9:03:24 AM

White River Junction — More than four months after it was originally slated to open, The Village at White River Junction — the $27 million assisted living and memory care facility on Gates Street — is set to welcome its first occupants this week.

And on Monday, developers Byron Hathorn and Brooke Ciardelli also resolved a dispute from a neighboring property owner over the certificate of occupancy for the five-story, 89-bed facility.

B-P Holdings LLC, owner of the building long occupied by the law firm Marsicovetere & Levine at 128 Gates St., appealed Hartford Zoning Administrator Jo-Ann Ells’ decision to approve revisions to The Village’s site development plan, as well her issuance of the occupancy permit.

Spearheading the appeals was Brian Marsicovetere, an attorney whose firm now also maintains a second office on North Main Street.

Filings on behalf of B-P Holdings cited numerous infringements onto the office property Marsicovetere claimed were not approved in The Village’s site development plan, including light pollution from the facility’s parking garage, boiler room noise that exceeds approved decibel levels and the presence of exhaust pipes that face the property and emit plumes.

A series of December letters sent to Hartford’s planning and zoning departments by South Burlington, Vt.-based construction lawyer William Fead on behalf of B-P Holdings also claimed that The Village’s overflow roof drainage pipes are directed toward the law property and that they have discharged onto its land and into its stormwater catch basin.

The two properties abut each other behind the United Methodist Church at 106 Gates St.

Alerted to these concerns, Ciardelli and Hathorn received zoning amendments for a number of adjustments, including an 8-foot fence to shield the machinery, the repositioning of the exhaust and drainage pipes and the planting of 22 arborvitae trees to create a boundary from the garage.

Light fixture shields have been installed and a boiler flue silencer has been ordered, Ciardelli said.

Ells, the zoning administrator, cited some of these adjustments in a memorandum to Fead and Marsicovetere explaining her decision to issue The Village its certificate of occupancy on Christmas Eve despite their concerns.

In response, B-P Holdings filed an appeal for the zoning amendments on Dec. 31, asking that it be reversed and remanded to Hartford’s planning commission for a public hearing. On Jan. 7, B-P appealed the certificate of occupancy, which has been scheduled to be addressed at the same hearing on Jan. 30.

Marsicovetere met separately on Friday with Hartford Town Manager Leo Pullar and Hathorn to discuss the issues, and both sides were hopeful an agreement that would prevent the public hearing could be reached soon.

“All of the issues are fixable, and none of the changes are going to impact (future residents),” Ciardelli said on Friday.

Reached by phone on Saturday, Marsicovetere indicated the talks were encouraging toward a resolution.

“I feel like we’re headed in the right direction,” he said. “I’m optimistic.”

And on Monday, both sides said they had reached an agreement to resolve the matter and that Marsicovetere would be withdrawing the appeals.

“The Village at White River Junction has met or will meet all criteria and has been awarded a certificate of occupancy from the state of Vermont and a certificate of occupancy from the town of Hartford conditioned on implementing some approved construction details in the near future,” Hathorn said in a joint statement with Marsicovetere. “The Village looks forward to residents moving in to the community this week.”

News staff writer John P. Gregg contributed to this report. Jared Pendak can be reached at jpendak@vnews.com or 603-727-3216.




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