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Forum, Sept. 30: Obstructing solar is not pro-N.H.


Sunday, September 29, 2019
Obstructing solar is not pro-N.H.

It’s no secret that renewable energy projects produce substantial environmental benefits for all and that these projects, especially solar, also represent tremendous economic benefit and business opportunity.

The policymakers in other New England states realize this, and they have enacted regulations calling for more renewables so that their residents benefit environmentally and financially. However, New Hampshire lags behind.

Obstruction of solar business growth through Gov. Chris Sununu’s veto of HB 365, a measure that would have raised the cap on solar net metering projects from 1 megawatt to 5 megawatts, and the Legislature’s failure to override that veto, goes against the demonstrated will of New Hampshire voters. Granite Staters deserve better from their representatives.

The kilowatt hours generated by solar projects in other states have a monetary value that is 30% to 40% more than comparable projects in New Hampshire. More favorable economics for these projects in neighboring states pushes the companies that build them to do business there, instead of here, meaning that we are missing out on both environmental and economic value.

I was born, raised and educated in New Hampshire. Now, after returning from military service, I live in New Hampshire and work as a project manager for White River Junction-based Norwich Solar Technologies, which builds projects in New Hampshire and Vermont.

As a result of new regulations in Maine and Massachusetts that encourage renewable energy projects, we will soon be doing business in those states, as well. My company would love to complete more projects in New Hampshire, but the Legislature’s failure to enact more energy incentives, and the governor’s vetoes on the rare occasion that it does, are driving us to do business elsewhere.

I encourage New Hampshire residents who support a friendly business environment, entrepreneurship, renewable energy or sustainable growth to become active in local clean energy initiatives and to hold elected officials responsible for inaction on delivering more favorable renewable energy policies.

EVAN WEAVER

Grantham

Take a look at Osher@Dartmouth

Catherine Baumgartner’s recent Forum letter (“A call to share your talents,” Sept. 24) asked why the “smart, creative people of the Upper Valley” aren’t teaching more classes.

I’d like to introduce her to the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, an organization sponsored by Dartmouth College. Osher@Dartmouth offers classes on just about any subject imaginable. To name just a few: history, languages, writing, poetry, films, mathematics, nuclear power, climate change, gardens, field trips, government, world affairs, and more.

I strongly suggest that anyone interested in enrichment classes contact Osher at 603-646-0154 or visit osher.dartmouth.edu. The office is on Lebanon Street in Hanover, in the same building as Salt hill Pub.

BOB CATTABRIGA

West Lebanon

Putting biomass plant on hold

Thank you, Dartmouth College, for putting the proposed biomass plant on hold. Dartmouth’s president and board members deserve praise for pausing their plans for a toxic biomass incinerator.

Dartmouth has the option of becoming a leader and innovator of non-combustion heating that is healthy for our community. We look forward to a fruitful exploration and solution to the college’s heating challenge.

LAURA SIMON

Wilder

Editorial was accurate, chilling

The editorial in the Sunday Valley News focusing on the Border Patrol checkpoints (“Necessary and important criticism: Border Patrol checkpoints are a dangerous precursor to an authoritarian government,” Sept. 22), is worthy of The New York Times, The Washington Post and any other of the top-tier newspapers in the United States.

Your clarity, unassailable logic and ability to make a point without “shouting” made this particular piece one of the finest I have ever read in any publication. Your emphatic conclusion, well made and spot on accurate, is chilling, to say the least.

BOB MAURER

West Lebanon