Forum, Dec. 2: Reflecting on my reflectives effort

Published: 12/1/2019 10:00:14 PM
Reflecting on my reflectives effort

In reference to Alv Elvestad’s Forum letter on safety and visibility (“To be safe, either walking or driving, be easy to see,” Nov. 4): Well, funny thing. As a member of the Lebanon Pedestrian and Bicyclist Advisory Committee, I’ve been trying for the past few months to get my citywide reflectives distribution project taken up and acted upon. Perhaps a groundswell of popular support will help to lift its wings.

And as a general note: Members of the public are always welcome to observe bodies of their city government in action.

SARAH CRYSL AKHTAR

Lebanon

The definition of ‘sustainable’ is inadequate

The word “sustainable” regarding forests is used about by various people. For decades various government and private entities have claimed that harvests about equal to gross annual growth of aboveground live biomass is “sustainable.” Pro-logging government forest departments and the logging industry are quite comfortable with that statement and repeat it as a standard mantra to inform the public.

This “sustainable” definition is inadequate because repeated harvests cause damage to belowground biomass and soils (leaching of nutrients due to logging on slopes, removing of nutrients due to harvests and emitting CO2 due to belowground biomass decay).

This ultimately leads to depleted forest soils, less robust growth, weak, sickly or misshapen trees and increased tree mortality. Taking from the forest year after year and not adequately restoring nutrients is not sustainable, ever. No farmer would treat cropland that way, if robust harvests were desired year after year.

As a minimum for sustainability, the nutrients removed by harvesting, plus those removed by leaching subsequent to harvesting, should be replenished and spread on the harvested forest floor. In addition, any biomass left on the forest floor after harvesting should be chipped and spread on the forest floor to enhance providing nutrients to the regrowing forest.

WILLEM POST

Woodstock

Not a fan of new radio show, or column’s bias

Recently, after returning to the area after an extended stay out of state, I learned that Keith Hanson is no longer doing a radio talk show on New London’s WNTK (“Sununu criticizes Sullivan County GOP official for ‘disgusting’ tweets,” Oct. 8). Then I had the misfortune of hearing his replacement, Jason Place, on his first day on the air. It reminded me of Alec Baldwin’s radio debut a number of years ago, except in comparison, Baldwin’s performance would have been enshrined in the Broadcast Hall of Fame.

Valley News business writer John Lippman’s recent column (“New WNTK radio host aims to bring less volatile voice than his predecessor,” Nov. 17) says Place has worked at nearly every radio station in the Upper Valley. Ya think there might be a reason? We learn Place has been in radio since age 12, but it sounds like he hasn’t learned all that much since. Despite the many phrases and adjectives I could use to describe this new radio show, the most apt is “cringeworthy,” something that hasn’t changed over the days I’ve periodically tuned in to see if maybe this was all a bad dream.

Also, I don’t need to be subject to Lippman’s biases relative to conservative talk radio. Besides, that genre is the one bringing in the revenue these days, and has for a long time. To believe otherwise is to think someone is bending over backward trying to find out what radio station carries Arnie Arnesen.

BRIAN BEGLEY

Wilmot, N.H.




Valley News

24 Interchange Drive
West Lebanon, NH 03784
603-298-8711

 

© 2019 Valley News
Terms & Conditions - Privacy Policy