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Pavano Injured In Vt.

Carl Pavano’s spleen was removed last week after the pitcher was injured when he fell in the snow.

The 37-year-old right-hander was hurt in mid-January at his home near Ludlow, Vt., and has been in a Connecticut hospital for nearly two weeks.

“He lost a lot of blood. It was very, very serious,” agent David Pepe said yesterday.

Pepe said Pavano didn’t think he was seriously injured after the fall, then didn’t feel well following a workout a few days later in Connecticut.

“He felt bad enough that he went to the hospital and he ended up getting admitted, and they realized he had a lacerated spleen,” Pepe said. “They tried to control the bleeding. They did all they could to not take it out and, unfortunately, he didn’t stop bleeding and he’s been in the hospital since.”

Pepe hopes Pavano will be released from the hospital this week. He would not put a timetable on the free agent’s possible return to baseball.

“To be quite honest, I think he’s very fortunate that he caught this thing. He had the presence of mind to go to a hospital,” Pepe said. “It could have been a lot worse. He’s just got to get his strength back and worry about baseball later.”

Pavano spent the past 3½ seasons with the Minnesota Twins, going 2-5 with a 6.00 ERA in 11 starts last year. He didn’t pitch after June 1 because of a strained right shoulder.

Extreme Sports

Snowmobiler Remains
In Critical Condition

Aspen, Colo. — Snowmobile rider Caleb Moore remains in critical condition after a crash at the Winter X Games in Aspen and is being closely monitored.

His family thanked Moore’s fans for their support yesterday and asked for their prayers.

The 25-year-old was performing a flip Thursday when he clipped the top of a jump and went over the handlebars. The snowmobile rolled over him, but he walked off the course with help and went to a hospital with a concussion.

College Sports

NCAA to Open
Sports Science Center

Indianapolis — The NCAA says it plans to start a new sports science center to help establish better safety standards for college football.

In a statement sent to The Associated Press yesterday, the NCAA calls player safety a “foundational” principle.

The comments come one day after President Obama said he would have to think long and hard about whether he would let a son, if he had one, play football.

At the Super Bowl, several players said they would let their sons play football, and former NFL offensive lineman Tony Borelli wrote on Twitter that while he would allow his sons to play football, he would “think long and hard” about letting them enter politics.