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Incognito Done as Miami Dolphin

Houston Texans head coach Gary Kubiak, center, his helped after he collapsed on the field during the second quarter of an NFL football game against the Indianapolis Colts, Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

Houston Texans head coach Gary Kubiak, center, his helped after he collapsed on the field during the second quarter of an NFL football game against the Indianapolis Colts, Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

Miami — Richie Incognito, the man in the midst of a national firestorm over alleged bullying and abuse of a teammate, broke his silence Tuesday, telling Miami television station WSVN: “I’m just trying to weather the storm right now. This will pass.”

When asked about the leaked voicemails, in which he reportedly called teammate Jonathan Martin by a racial slur, Incognito gave no comment.

Incognito was suspended late Sunday, although the Miami Dolphins will not say if it is with or without pay. The Miami Herald learned Monday that Incognito will never play for the Dolphins again. He is on the suspended/reserve list.

On Tuesday, they filled his spot on the roster by signing guard David Arkin, who was previously on the Dallas Cowboys’ practice squad.

Despite expectations that he would be placed on the non-football injury list, Martin remained on the active roster Tuesday — meaning he will collect his $35,733 weekly paycheck this week, as usual.

Meanwhile, the NFL Players Association on Tuesday weighed into the mess, releasing a statement that demonstrates the fine line it must walk, seeing as the union represents both players involved.

“We expect that the NFL and its clubs create a safe and professional workplace for all players and that owners, executives, coaches and players should set the best standards and examples,” the NFLPA said in a statement on its website. “It is the duty of this union to hold the clubs and teams accountable for safety and professionalism in the workplace.

“As the representative organization of all players, the NFLPA will insist on a fair investigation for all involved,” the statement continued. “We will continue to remain in contact with the impacted players, their representatives and player leadership.”

Texans Coach Out Indefinitely

Houston — Houston Texans coach Gary Kubiak is out of the hospital after suffering what the team said was a mini-stroke, but there’s no word on when he will resume coaching duties.

The team said the 52-year-old Kubiak suffered a transient ischemic attack at halftime of Sunday’s loss to Indianapolis. He was released from the hospital on Tuesday and is expected to make a full recovery.

“I’ve been through an ordeal, and my focus now is to get back to good health,” Kubiak said in a statement released by the team. “Doctors have told me I will make a full recovery.”

Kubiak collapsed on the field and was rushed to a hospital. The Texans blew an 18-point lead without him and the 27-24 setback was the team’s sixth straight loss.

A transient ischemic attack, or TIA, occurs when blood flow to the brain is briefly interrupted, typically by a blood clot or narrowed blood vessels. TIAs are often called mini-strokes and can cause stroke-like symptoms including sudden dizziness, numbness, vision loss or unconsciousness, though symptoms last only a few minutes or a few hours and no permanent brain damage occurs. TIAs are often a warning sign for a future stroke.

Houston didn’t identify an interim coach as it prepared for Sunday’s game at Arizona. Defensive coordinator Wade Phillips, a former head coach for Dallas, took over after Kubiak was taken to the hospital, and he ran Houston’s practice on Monday. Offensive coordinator Rick Dennison likely will take over the play-calling duties if Kubiak isn’t back by Sunday.

D.C. Council Urges
Redskins Name Change

Washington — For the second time in its history, the D.C. Council has called on the Washington Redskins to change their nickname.

By a 10-0 vote, the council approved a resolution Tuesday urging the team to abandon the nickname, which some consider offensive to Native Americans. One member abstained, and two were absent.

The council has no power over the team, which plays its home games in Maryland and has its training facility in Virginia. It previously called for a name change in 2001.

President Barack Obama said recently that he would consider changing the name if he owned the team. Redskins owner Daniel Snyder has called the name “a badge of honor” but says he respects the feelings of those who are offended.