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Skins’ Name Discussed

  • Ray Halbritter, National Representative of the Oneida Indian Nation gestures as he speaks during the Oneida Indian Nation's Change the Mascot symposium, Monday, Oct. 7, 2013, in Washington, calling for the Washington Redskins NFL football team to change its name. During an interview, President Barack Obama suggested that the owner of the Washington Redskins football team consider changing its name because, the president said, the current name offends "a sizable group of people." (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Ray Halbritter, National Representative of the Oneida Indian Nation gestures as he speaks during the Oneida Indian Nation's Change the Mascot symposium, Monday, Oct. 7, 2013, in Washington, calling for the Washington Redskins NFL football team to change its name. During an interview, President Barack Obama suggested that the owner of the Washington Redskins football team consider changing its name because, the president said, the current name offends "a sizable group of people." (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

  • Ray Halbritter, National Representative of the Oneida Indian Nation gestures as he speaks during the Oneida Indian Nation's Change the Mascot symposium, Monday, Oct. 7, 2013, in Washington, calling for the Washington Redskins NFL football team to change its name. During an interview, President Barack Obama suggested that the owner of the Washington Redskins football team consider changing its name because, the president said, the current name offends "a sizable group of people." (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Ray Halbritter, National Representative of the Oneida Indian Nation gestures as he speaks during the Oneida Indian Nation's Change the Mascot symposium, Monday, Oct. 7, 2013, in Washington, calling for the Washington Redskins NFL football team to change its name. During an interview, President Barack Obama suggested that the owner of the Washington Redskins football team consider changing its name because, the president said, the current name offends "a sizable group of people." (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

  • The shadow of Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., is cast on the backdrop during the Oneida Indian Nation's Change the Mascot symposium, Monday, Oct. 7, 2013, in Washington, calling for the Washington Redskins NFL football team to change its name. During an interview, President Barack Obama suggested that the owner of the Washington Redskins football team consider changing its name because, the president said, the current name offends "a sizable group of people." (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    The shadow of Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., is cast on the backdrop during the Oneida Indian Nation's Change the Mascot symposium, Monday, Oct. 7, 2013, in Washington, calling for the Washington Redskins NFL football team to change its name. During an interview, President Barack Obama suggested that the owner of the Washington Redskins football team consider changing its name because, the president said, the current name offends "a sizable group of people." (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

  • The shadow of Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., is cast on the backdrop during the Oneida Indian Nation's Change the Mascot symposium, Monday, Oct. 7, 2013, in Washington, calling for the Washington Redskins NFL football team to change its name. During an interview, President Barack Obama suggested that the owner of the Washington Redskins football team consider changing its name because, the president said, the current name offends "a sizable group of people." (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    The shadow of Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., is cast on the backdrop during the Oneida Indian Nation's Change the Mascot symposium, Monday, Oct. 7, 2013, in Washington, calling for the Washington Redskins NFL football team to change its name. During an interview, President Barack Obama suggested that the owner of the Washington Redskins football team consider changing its name because, the president said, the current name offends "a sizable group of people." (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

  • Ray Halbritter, National Representative of the Oneida Indian Nation gestures as he speaks during the Oneida Indian Nation's Change the Mascot symposium, Monday, Oct. 7, 2013, in Washington, calling for the Washington Redskins NFL football team to change its name. During an interview, President Barack Obama suggested that the owner of the Washington Redskins football team consider changing its name because, the president said, the current name offends "a sizable group of people." (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
  • Ray Halbritter, National Representative of the Oneida Indian Nation gestures as he speaks during the Oneida Indian Nation's Change the Mascot symposium, Monday, Oct. 7, 2013, in Washington, calling for the Washington Redskins NFL football team to change its name. During an interview, President Barack Obama suggested that the owner of the Washington Redskins football team consider changing its name because, the president said, the current name offends "a sizable group of people." (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
  • The shadow of Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., is cast on the backdrop during the Oneida Indian Nation's Change the Mascot symposium, Monday, Oct. 7, 2013, in Washington, calling for the Washington Redskins NFL football team to change its name. During an interview, President Barack Obama suggested that the owner of the Washington Redskins football team consider changing its name because, the president said, the current name offends "a sizable group of people." (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
  • The shadow of Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., is cast on the backdrop during the Oneida Indian Nation's Change the Mascot symposium, Monday, Oct. 7, 2013, in Washington, calling for the Washington Redskins NFL football team to change its name. During an interview, President Barack Obama suggested that the owner of the Washington Redskins football team consider changing its name because, the president said, the current name offends "a sizable group of people." (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Washington — The NFL is prepared to meet with a Native American tribe pushing for the Washington Redskins to drop the team’s nickname. Just not this week.

As league owners gathered Monday in the nation’s capital for their fall meetings, the Oneida Indian Nation held a symposium across town to promote their “Change the Mascot” campaign. Oneida representative Ray Halbritter said the NFL was invited to attend.

Instead, NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy said, a meeting has been scheduled for next month — and could happen sooner. “We respect that people have differing views,” McCarthy said. “It is important that we listen to all perspectives.”

He said the Redskins name is not on the agenda for the owners’ meetings. Redskins owner Dan Snyder has vowed to keep the name, and an AP-GfK poll conducted in April found that nearly 80 percent Americans don’t think the team should change its name.

It’s a topic generating discussion lately, though. President Obama said in an interview with The Associated Press last week that he would “think about changing” the team’s name if he were the owner.

Halbritter called that statement “nothing less than historic” and said the team’s nickname is “a divisive epithet … and an outdated sign of division and hate.”

Monday’s Game

Jets 30, Falcons 28

Atlanta — Nick Folk kicked a 43-yard field goal on the final play of the game and New York handed struggling Atlanta its third straight loss.

The Falcons rallied from a 27-14 deficit in the fourth quarter, going ahead on Matt Ryan’s 3-yard touchdown pass to Levine Toilolo with 1:54 remaining.

But rookie Geno Smith, who threw three touchdown passes, guided the Jets (3-2) on the winning drive. He completed four straight passes and ran for an 8-yard gain before the Jets ran the clock down and sent Folk on for the last play.

Jacquizz Rodgers scored on a pair of touchdown runs, and Ryan also threw a scoring pass to Jason Snelling.

But the Falcons (1-4) are now mired in their longest losing streak since 2007.