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Bruschi Among Inductees Into College Hall

New York — Heisman Trophy winners Danny Wuerffel of Florida and Ron Dayne of Wisconsin, along with two-time national champion Tommie Frazier of Nebraska and Arizona linebacker Tedy Bruschi, were selected yesterday for the College Football Hall of Fame.

They are part of a class of 12 players and two coaches chosen by the National Football Foundation and revealed Tuesday.

The rest of the players, to be inducted in December are: Miami Heisman winner Vinny Testaverde, whose selection was announced Monday; Ted Brown of North Carolina State; Jerry Gray of Texas; Steve Meilinger of Kentucky; Orlando Pace of Ohio State; Rod Shoate of Oklahoma; Percy Snow of Michigan State; and Don Trull of Baylor.

The new Hall of Fame coaches are Wayne Hardin, who led Navy and Temple, and Bill McCartney of Colorado.

Wuerffel won the Heisman in 1996, when he led the Gators to the national championship, throwing for 3,625 yards and 39 touchdowns in coach Steve Spurrier’s Fun-n-Gun offense.

Frazier was a four-year starter running coach Tom Osborne’s option attack, and helped the Huskers to national championships in 1994 and ‘95. His tackling-breaking 75-yard touchdown run put an exclamation point on Nebraska’s 62-24 victory over Wuerffel and Florida in the 1996 Orange Bowl national title game.

Bruschi, who later starred for the New England Patriots, had 52 sacks as part of Arizona’s Desert Swarm defenses during the mid-1990s.

Auto Racing

No Fine for Newman’s Comments

Concord, n.c. — NASCAR said yesterday that Ryan Newman will not be fined for his rebuke of NASCAR on live television following a late accident at Talladega.

Newman’s race ended Sunday in a 12-car accident when Kurt Busch’s car barrel-rolled on top of his car.

Newman said his TV interview was solely to complain that NASCAR had made plenty of safety advances but still couldn’t figure out how to keep cars on the track. He used a vulgarity in his interview.

Not fining Newman is consistent with NASCAR chairman Brian France’s decision to give drivers’ permission to criticize anything but the cars and the on-track product. Denny Hamlin was fined $25,000 in March for saying he didn’t think NASCAR’s new car races as well as the old car.

Tennis

Djokovic Loses at Madrid

Madrid — Grigor Dimitrov stunned Novak Djokovic in the second round of the Madrid Open yesterday, beating the top-ranked Serb 7-6 (6), 6-7 (8), 6-3 for the biggest win of his career.

The 28th-ranked Bulgarian saved three set points in the first before taking the lead, and Djokovic then appeared to hurt his right ankle while trailing 4-2 in the second. The Serbian player slipped on the baseline and winced in pain, then immediately called for a trainer and took a lengthy break to get treatment.

The wait for the match to resume annoyed the crowd, who turned against Djokovic and began chanting Dimitrov’s name.

Earlier, defending champion Roger Federer looked comfortable on clay in his first match in two months, easing past Radek Stepanek of the Czech Republic 6-3, 6-3 to reach the third round.

In the women’s half of the draw, defending champion Serena Williams moved into the third round after beating Lourdes Dominguez Lino of Spain 6-2, 7-5.

NBA Basketball

Suns Hire GM

Phoenix — The Phoenix Suns hired Boston Celtics executive Ryan McDonough as their next general manager.

McDonough worked his way up from a 23-year-old special assistant to basketball operations in Boston to becoming assistant general manager the past three years.

McDonough’s father, the late Will McDonough, was a long-time columnist for the Boston Globe. His brother, Sean, is an announcer for ESPN and another brother, Terry, is the former director of player personnel for the Jacksonville Jaguars.