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Cink Leads in San Diego; Tiger 8 Back

San Diego — The best score belonged to Stewart Cink. The best round belonged to Pat Perez. Tiger Woods didn’t come close to claiming either Thursday in the Farmers Insurance Open, where the seven-time champion failed to break par in the opening round for first time in his career.

Cink ran off three straight birdies late in his round on the easier North Course at Torrey Pines for an 8-under 64. That gave him a one-shot lead over Gary Woodland, who also was on the North, which is more than 600 yards shorter.

Perez was on the South Course, host of the 2008 U.S. Open and with greens so firm this year that it felt like a major. Perez had a 67, the best score on the South by two shots, and even more astounding is that he played bogey-free.

The South played nearly four shots harder than the North.

Woods, making his 2014 debut, failed to birdie any of the par 5s and had to settle for a 72.

Keegan Bradley of Wooodstock, Vt., shot a 69, as did Phil Mickelson.

Bahamas LPGA Classic

Paradise Island, Bahamas — Lydia Ko took a share of the lead in her first start as an LPGA Tour member, matching Meena Lee with a 5-under 68 in the season-opening Bahamas LPGA Classic.

The 16-year-old Ko turned pro late last year. She won the Canadian Women’s Open the last two years as an amateur and closed last season with a victory in a non-tour event in Taiwan in her second pro start.

Baseball

Hall Plaques Sport Blank Caps

Cooperstown, n.y. — Greg Maddux and Tony La Russa will not have logos on their Hall of Fame plaques.

The decision was announced Thursday by the Hall, which said Joe Torre’s plaque will have the logo of the New York Yankees.

Plaques for Tom Glavine and Bobby Cox will have Atlanta Braves logos, and Frank Thomas’ will have the logo of the Chicago White Sox.

The six will be inducted during ceremonies on July 27. The managers were elected last month by the Hall’s expansion-era committee and the players were chosen this month by the Baseball Writers Association of America.

Of the 300 previous Hall members, 86 have caps with logos and 42 don’t have caps.

Maddux began his big league career with the Chicago Cubs from 1986-92, winning the first of his four Cy Young Awards in his final season at Wrigley Field. He was with the Braves from 1993-03, winning Cy Youngs in his first three seasons in Atlanta, then returned to the Cubs from 2004-06. He also played for the Los Angeles Dodgers and San Diego Padres from 2006-08.

“I feel good about it, I spent half my career in Chicago and half of my career in Atlanta,” Maddux said during a news conference in Arlington, Texas. “I love both places. Obviously, I feel like I had more success as a Brave. We did get a World Series there, but I kind of came up a Cub. For me, I couldn’t pick. I really couldn’t. ... So I’m going to go in neutral, I guess.”

Hall President Jeff Idelson said a logo makes sense for those “whose most compelling contributions clearly took place with one team” and not having a team logo is “equally acceptable” for those whose careers were built significantly among multiple teams.

“Regardless of the selection, a Hall of Famer belong to every team for which he played or managed, as well as every fan who followed his career,” Idelson said.

Jurisprudence

Man Gets 57 Years In Sean Taylor’s Death

Miami — The man who prosecutors say fired the shot that killed Washington Redskins star Sean Taylor during a botched 2007 burglary was sentenced Thursday to more than 57 years in state prison.

Miami-Dade Circuit Judge Dennis Murphy imposed the sentence on Eric Rivera, 23, one of five Fort Myers-area men charged with Taylor’s death after they broke into his house looking to steal cash. One has pleaded guilty and three others are still awaiting trial.

Rivera confessed to police on videotape that he shot Taylor after the NFL player confronted them at his bedroom door with a machete. In the confession, Rivera also said the group didn’t realize Taylor would be home with a knee injury instead of playing a Redskins game against Tampa Bay.

“He lost his life defending and protecting his family,” said Assistant State Attorney Reid Rubin in a closing statement. “They kicked the door in and they shot him and killed him, for no good reason.”

Testifying in his own defense last fall, Rivera claimed the confession was false and improperly coerced, and that someone else in the group shot Taylor with a 9mm handgun. A jury convicted him of second-degree murder and armed burglary.

He was originally charged with first-degree murder but was ineligible for the death penalty because he was 17 at the time of the killing.