Editorials

Editorial: Supercomputer Recipes

Saturday, May 23, 2015

An editorial could some day be authored by a computer, but not yet. Ours are written by humans for the time being, although we could imagine typing in keywords and phrases — Norwich bandstand, outrage, infrastructure, campaign finance, Founding Fathers, deflated footballs — and letting a computer finish the job. But as of yet we are not feeling threatened by Watson, the IBM supercomputer that has vanquished chess masters and …

Editorial: Judgment Calls

Thursday, May 21, 2015

It appears that just about everybody running for president in 2016 now agrees about at least one thing: The 2003 invasion of Iraq was a mistake. This consensus includes not only Hillary Clinton, who voted as a member of the U.S. Senate to authorize the war, but also most of the Republican field. Last into that chastened fold was Jeb Bush, who swung …

Editorial: Digital Disruption and Vermont PBS

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

In 1995, then-House speaker Newt Gingrich called for the privatization of the Public Broadcasting System. He and other conservatives claimed that the explosion of new cable channels such as History, Arts and Entertainment and Bravo had made highbrow — and suspected left-leaning — PBS redundant. Twenty years later, we can see how wrong he was. The owners of cable channels ultimately pursued profits, …

Editorial: Look for the GMO Label

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Vermont officials appear optimistic that the state’s new GMO-labeling law, the first of its kind in the nation, will withstand a pending legal challenge from the food industry. Indeed, there are grounds for such optimism. Last month, U.S. District Court Judge Christina Reiss denied a preliminary injunction sought …

Editorial: Saving for Retirement

Monday, May 18, 2015

America’s middle-class workers have plenty to worry about — but for many, the biggest anxiety is what happens when they are workers no longer. Many will reach retirement only to find they have saved too little to live comfortably. Some will choose to postpone their retirement; others may …

Editorial: Divided Norwich

Sunday, May 17, 2015

Is it time to call in a Norwich whisperer? The Upper Valley’s politically contentious town has for the second time in just two months slammed the door on a proposal to borrow money — about $3 million this time — to renovate municipal facilities. If estimates were correct …

Column: New Neuroscience of Childhood Stresses Strong Attachments

Saturday, May 16, 2015

Doctors see disease and they think about genes and germs, molecules and chemicals. But there’s a new recommendation from the neuroscience lab: Think about human relationships too. It’s turning out that babies’ earliest attachment relationships help set their lives’ paths toward disease or health. Lifelong health, as it …

Editorial: Dressed Down for Prom

Saturday, May 16, 2015

Let’s talk about “prom.” The word, referring to a formal dance in celebration of graduation, derives from Middle French, promenade, meaning to walk leisurely, which in turn derives from late Latin, prominare, “to drive (animals) onward,” a combination of pro (“forth”) and minare (“to drive animals with shouts”). …

Editorial: The Health Care Fix Is Not In

Friday, May 15, 2015

The U.S. health care system has been squeezing the country’s middle class for years. The passage of the Affordable Care Act has relieved some of the pressure, but there’s much more to do. With or without Obamacare, the issues are the same: access and cost. If losing your …

Editorial: Teaching and Tenure at Dartmouth College

Thursday, May 14, 2015

The Dartmouth students demanding the reinstatement of a popular lecturer aren’t likely to prevail, but their petition to the administration demonstrates conviction for what ought to be every academic institution’s principal aim: good teaching. Indeed, a college known for its excellence in undergraduate instruction should be pleased that …

Editorial: What Do Voters Want?

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

What do voters want? That question has challenged and vexed decision-makers for years. Various methodologies have been used — instinct, talk overheard at the diner, the now-discredited consensus of the old boy’s club — but it strikes us that divining the will of the people can be as …

Editorial: Brady, Deflated

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady is being punished. Yesterday, the National Football League announced its sentence in deflategate: a four-game suspension for Brady, a $1 million fine for the team and the loss of draft picks. A special investigator told the league last week that Brady was …

Editorial: Protecting the Troops

Monday, May 11, 2015

A Defense Department report this month found that fewer men and women in uniform said they were subjected to unwanted sexual attention last year and that there has been an increase in victims reporting sex-related crimes. The improvements are, at best, incremental and overshadowed by the unsettling statistic …