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Opinion

In this undated photo provided by International Business Machines Corp. (IBM) the Random Access Method of Accounting and Control (RAMAC) IBM RAM 305 from the 1950's, is shown. IBM was formed on June 16, 1911, as the Computing Tabulating Recording Co. in a merger of four separate companies. The new business with a plant in Endicott, N.Y., made scales, time clocks, cheese slicers and _ significantly for its future _ machines that read data stored on punch cards. (AP Photo/IBM Corp.)

Column: Big Blue Sings the Blues, and Here’s Why

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Big Blue’s got the blues. On Monday, IBM’s stock tumbled by 7 percent after it unveiled a dismal quarterly earnings report that showed a 4 …

Column: Hey, Senate Colleagues: Let’s Do Lunch

Saturday, October 25, 2014

So two U.S. senators, a Republican and a Democrat, are marooned for a week on a deserted island. . . . Sounds like a lead-in …

Editorial: Contain the Islamic State

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Western leaders sometimes suggest that the Islamic State is its own worst enemy, so extreme in doctrine and practice that it will galvanize opposition within …

Friday, October 17, 2014

Column: Germany’s Appalling Economic Prescription

Friday, October 17, 2014

I am a fan of Germany’s worker empowerment. By requiring corporations to divide their boards evenly between worker and management representatives and mandating that employers meet regularly with their employees to discuss and resolve company concerns, Germany has retained a high-end manufacturing sector that has enabled the nation …

Column: Leave the Driving to the Radar, the Sensors and the Software

Friday, October 17, 2014

My prediction is that in fewer than 15 years, we will be debating whether human beings should be allowed to drive on highways. After all, we are prone to road rage; rush headlong into traffic jams; break rules; get distracted; and crash into each other. That is why …

Forum, Oct. 17: Thinking Green at the Co-op; Co-op Needs Outside Help; Chemo ‘Cold Caps’; A Bad Proposal for Claremont

Friday, October 17, 2014

Co-op Offers Choice And Education To the Editor: Amidst the criticism of the Co-op Food Stores published in the Forum I have seen no recognition that they are addressing the most urgent challenge of our time, namely climate change. Amanda Charland, sustainability coordinator, has been exploring in depth …

Column: Will Enthusiasm Gap Be the Dems’ Downfall?

Friday, October 17, 2014

National polling on the Nov. 4 midterm elections confirms a doleful trend that’s been firming up all year: Voters aren’t enthusiastic about their choices — on either side. A Gallup Poll last week found that only 32 percent of voters said they felt “extremely motivated” to go to …

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Column: Leave the Driving to the Radar, the Sensors and the Software

Friday, October 17, 2014

My prediction is that in fewer than 15 years, we will be debating whether human beings should be allowed to drive on highways. After all, we are prone to road rage; rush headlong into traffic jams; break rules; get distracted; and crash into each other. That is why …

Editorial: The New Mediocre

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

It’s never wise to base policy on the gyrations of the stock market, but the sell-off on Wall Street this week reflects investors’ increasing nervousness about global economic growth — and their fears are not unfounded. To the contrary, the International Monetary Fund’s forecasters describe the global recovery …

Column: From the Booming Me Generation to the Connected Us Generation

Thursday, October 16, 2014

We are living longer, something to celebrate. The average life expectancy was about 62 years in 1935 when President Franklin Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act, and it’s now nearly 79 years. And, as in many things, the baby boomers are at the center of another revolution: unretirement. …

Column: A Mix-Up at the Sperm Bank

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Three years ago, Jennifer Cramblett and her partner, Amanda Zinkon, went shopping for sperm. Not just any sperm would do. They decided that the sperm used to artificially inseminate Cramblett with their first child would have to come from a man with genetic traits similar to theirs. In …