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Letter: Dartmouth Has an Admissions Problem

To the Editor:

As if we were not already sick to death of the Dimensions charade and the liberal applause in support of the original protesters from the Dartmouth administration (without a word of thanks to the many who took umbrage, and expressed it, to this unfortunate performance), now comes the sanctimonious editorial in the Valley News (“Changing the Culture,” June 1), written in echo of what Dartmouth had put forth.

Yes, Dartmouth has a problem, and it originates in the office of admissions. All 18-year-olds who are admitted should have sufficient sophistication to realize that they are entering a new world where, if they are to be successful, they must be ready to take care of themselves. If the admissions office — whether from pressure applied, whether to maintain quotas that are faltering or whether to satisfy personal desires — accepts so many of the less confident, then it must take the blame for these students’ lack of success. Admissions should help them find a less stressful environment, with an apology for not understanding at the beginning. The college should not be called upon to solve every whine.

Meanwhile, let the college faculty, coaches and all within its structure continue to build the leaders for tomorrow, a group that is sadly under-represented in today’s admissions profile. They are the ones who are ready for the fast start to appreciate all life on campus in productive, not destructive, ways. Hopefully, they might pass on this attitude to the “me-first” group who chooses to nurture their sense of entitlement.

Winifred Anthony Stearns

Hanover

Related

Changing The Culture

Monday, June 3, 2013

“Dartmouth has a problem,” asserted a group of students last month, calling attention once again to verbal and sexual abuse on campus. The alarmingly hostile reaction to the protest and to the 15 or so protesters — name-calling and threats communicated largely through the anonymous shield of social media — set in relief another problem. Too many undergraduates just don’t …