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For Randolph, A Quiet Year

  • New London police chief Edward Andersen talks with resident Doug MacMichael after MacMichael spotted Andersen in front of the New London Police Department in New London, N.H., on February 27, 2014. "He comes by a lot, asking, 'Did you get it?'" said Andersen, referring to his new position as chief that he started that day. (Valley News - Will Parson)

    New London police chief Edward Andersen talks with resident Doug MacMichael after MacMichael spotted Andersen in front of the New London Police Department in New London, N.H., on February 27, 2014. "He comes by a lot, asking, 'Did you get it?'" said Andersen, referring to his new position as chief that he started that day. (Valley News - Will Parson)

  • New London police chief Edward Andersen talks with resident Doug MacMichael after MacMichael spotted Andersen in front of the New London Police Department in New London, N.H., on February 27, 2014. "He comes by a lot, asking, 'Did you get it?'" said Andersen, referring to his new position as chief that he started that day. (Valley News - Will Parson)

    New London police chief Edward Andersen talks with resident Doug MacMichael after MacMichael spotted Andersen in front of the New London Police Department in New London, N.H., on February 27, 2014. "He comes by a lot, asking, 'Did you get it?'" said Andersen, referring to his new position as chief that he started that day. (Valley News - Will Parson)

  • New London police chief Edward Andersen talks with resident Doug MacMichael after MacMichael spotted Andersen in front of the New London Police Department in New London, N.H., on February 27, 2014. "He comes by a lot, asking, 'Did you get it?'" said Andersen, referring to his new position as chief that he started that day. (Valley News - Will Parson)
  • New London police chief Edward Andersen talks with resident Doug MacMichael after MacMichael spotted Andersen in front of the New London Police Department in New London, N.H., on February 27, 2014. "He comes by a lot, asking, 'Did you get it?'" said Andersen, referring to his new position as chief that he started that day. (Valley News - Will Parson)

Randolph School District Meeting is set for 10 a.m. on Tuesday, March 4 at Chandler Music Hall. The Town Meeting will follow. The polls will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. for voting on town and school officers, budgets and most other business.

Randolph — Voters here face Town and School District Meetings with few major initiatives on the warnings, and modest projected tax increases.

The town government will spend more money on capital projects and reserves in the coming year, and has included funding in the budget to bring recreation programs back in house, Town Manager Melvin Adams said.

Otherwise, the budget is relatively unchanged and the property tax rate to support town operations is projected to increase by less than half a penny.

“I think for us this is going to be a pretty calm meeting,” Adams said.

Overall, general fund spending is slated to increase by $1,400, little more than a rounding error in a $2.46 million budget.

For a decade, Randolph contracted with the local chapter of the Boys and Girls club to run recreation programs, including a town rink, swimming pool and camps. But the club has lost its primary funding and wasn’t able to maintain Randolph’s programs, Adams said.

So the town will spend an additional $64,000 to hire staff and an extra $10,000 for supplies for the programs. That spending will be offset by the revenue those programs generate, money that used to flow to the Boys and Girls Club.

Voting on the budget and other spending articles, including budgets for police, water and sewer funds, will be by Australian ballot on Tuesday. Voting for town and school district officials will be held the same day. There are no contested races on the ballot.

On the school side, the homestead tax is projected to increase from $1.28 per $100 of assessed value to $1.33, which includes the town’s share of the costs at Randolph Union High School. For the owner of a $200,000 home who is not eligible for Vermont’s income sensitivity program, that would be a projected $100 tax increase.

The elementary school’s share is 62 cents, up from a little over 60 cents this year.

Spending at Randolph Elementary is budgeted at a little over $4.5 million, an increase of just shy of $62,000 from the current year’s. That’s a 1.4 percent increase.

Much of the increase is attributable to higher wages ($116,000) and benefits ($80,000) for the school’s teachers. The higher spending is offset by cuts in administration and support services.

A meager turnout of 5 percent of voters in Randolph, Brookfield and Braintree already approved the union high school’s $8 million budget in Australian ballot voting on Feb. 4.

Alex Hanson can be reached at ahanson@vnews.com .