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Argument Over F-35s in Vt. Continues

  • In this Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Lt. Col. Dan Finnegan stands by an F-16 fighter plane as he's interviewed in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

    In this Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Lt. Col. Dan Finnegan stands by an F-16 fighter plane as he's interviewed in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Lt. Col. Dan Finnegan stands by an F-16 fighter plane as he's interviewed in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

    In this Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Lt. Col. Dan Finnegan stands by an F-16 fighter plane as he's interviewed in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Master Sgt. Andrew Ehlers does repairs on an F-16 fighter plane in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

    In this Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Master Sgt. Andrew Ehlers does repairs on an F-16 fighter plane in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Master Sgt. Andrew Ehlers does repairs on an F-16 fighter plane in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

    In this Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Master Sgt. Andrew Ehlers does repairs on an F-16 fighter plane in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Master Sgt. Andrew Ehlers does repairs on an F-16 fighter plane in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

    In this Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Master Sgt. Andrew Ehlers does repairs on an F-16 fighter plane in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Lt. Col. Dan Finnegan stands by an F-16 fighter plane as he's interviewed in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

    In this Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Lt. Col. Dan Finnegan stands by an F-16 fighter plane as he's interviewed in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Col. David Baczewski, commander of the 158th Fighter Wing, Vermont Air National Guard, speaks during an interview in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

    In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Col. David Baczewski, commander of the 158th Fighter Wing, Vermont Air National Guard, speaks during an interview in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Col. David Baczewski, commander of the 158th Fighter Wing, Vermont Air National Guard, speaks during an interview in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

    In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Col. David Baczewski, commander of the 158th Fighter Wing, Vermont Air National Guard, speaks during an interview in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Col. David Baczewski, commander of the 158th Fighter Wing, Vermont Air National Guard, speaks during an interview in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

    In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Col. David Baczewski, commander of the 158th Fighter Wing, Vermont Air National Guard, speaks during an interview in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Rosanne Greco stands on her porch in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

    In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Rosanne Greco stands on her porch in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Rosanne Greco stands on her porch in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

    In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Rosanne Greco stands on her porch in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Rosanne Greco stands on her porch in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

    In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Rosanne Greco stands on her porch in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Rosanne Greco points to a report card on the Vermont Air Guard base in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

    In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Rosanne Greco points to a report card on the Vermont Air Guard base in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Rosanne Greco points to a report card on the Vermont Air Guard base in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

    In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Rosanne Greco points to a report card on the Vermont Air Guard base in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Rosanne Greco points to a report card on the Vermont Air Guard base in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

    In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Rosanne Greco points to a report card on the Vermont Air Guard base in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Master Sgt. Andrew Ehlers does repairs on an F-16 fighter plane in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

    In this Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Master Sgt. Andrew Ehlers does repairs on an F-16 fighter plane in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Lt. Col. Dan Finnegan stands by an F-16 fighter plane as he's interviewed in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
  • In this Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Lt. Col. Dan Finnegan stands by an F-16 fighter plane as he's interviewed in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
  • In this Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Master Sgt. Andrew Ehlers does repairs on an F-16 fighter plane in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
  • In this Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Master Sgt. Andrew Ehlers does repairs on an F-16 fighter plane in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
  • In this Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Master Sgt. Andrew Ehlers does repairs on an F-16 fighter plane in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
  • In this Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Lt. Col. Dan Finnegan stands by an F-16 fighter plane as he's interviewed in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
  • In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Col. David Baczewski, commander of the 158th Fighter Wing, Vermont Air National Guard, speaks during an interview in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
  • In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Col. David Baczewski, commander of the 158th Fighter Wing, Vermont Air National Guard, speaks during an interview in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
  • In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Col. David Baczewski, commander of the 158th Fighter Wing, Vermont Air National Guard, speaks during an interview in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
  • In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Rosanne Greco stands on her porch in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
  • In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Rosanne Greco stands on her porch in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
  • In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Rosanne Greco stands on her porch in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
  • In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Rosanne Greco points to a report card on the Vermont Air Guard base in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
  • In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Rosanne Greco points to a report card on the Vermont Air Guard base in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
  • In this Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Rosanne Greco points to a report card on the Vermont Air Guard base in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
  • In this Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 photo, Master Sgt. Andrew Ehlers does repairs on an F-16 fighter plane in South Burlington, Vt. To people hoping the Air Force will choose Vermont as home to at least 18 F-35 fighter planes, the next-generation aircraft is a source of hundreds of jobs, millions of dollars for the local economy and incalculable state pride. To opponents, the plane is a looming nuisance so much louder than its predecessor, the F-16, it will make life unbearable for people beneath its flight path. The Air Force is nearing its decision about where it will base the planes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

South Burlington, Vt. — Plans on where to base the U.S. military’s next-generation fighter jet, the F-35, concern people in communities from California to Florida to Maine who worry the aircraft are too loud.

In Vermont, where the Air National Guard has flown planes from Burlington International Airport for more than 60 years, opponents are especially vocal. But in other communities, even some long accustomed to the roar of military aircraft, the noise of the F-35 has been an issue.

South Burlington City Council President Rosanne Greco, a retired Air Force officer, said she favored bringing the F-35 to her community until she read the draft environmental impact statement released last spring.

The F-35s “will have incredibly significant negative impact on up to 10,000 people who will be unfortunate enough to be in the noise contour zone that the federal government deems unsuitable for residential use,” Greco said. “For me it’s become a clear-cut analytical choice. The facts say this is harmful to our environment.”

The report, she said, considers exposure to average aircraft noise greater than 65 decibels (about the sound of a vacuum cleaner about three feet away) “not considered suitable for residential use.” Another section discusses the potential long-term health impacts of exposure to aircraft noise.

The plane’s supporters say Greco is exaggerating the number of people who would be affected by the noise contour zone. And they believe she and others are cherry-picking information from the report without providing its full context. There is a section of the report that discusses long-term health effects, for example, but it concludes there aren’t any significant health impacts.

The Air Force already has chosen where it will base the F-35s, also known as the Joint Strike Fighter, for training. The next step is to decide where to base the first operational planes, those that would be ready for war.

“Vermont is the most vocal, but Vermont is the preferred alternative for the Guard unit,” Air Force spokeswoman Ann Stefanek said. “But it’s the not the only alternative.”

Plans are to base 18 to 24 of the new aircraft in South Burlington by 2020. The military’s final decision on the first round of operational bases is expected next spring.

How much louder the planes are than other aircraft is debatable. Opponents cite Air Force charts indicating the F-35 can be at least twice as loud as the F-16 now flown out of Vermont. Others say that’s an unfair comparison because measuring sound involves everything from how the planes are flown to weather conditions, the time of day and how long people are exposed.

F-35 supporters in Vermont say the opponents — who have a Facebook page and a separate website — are a small group of activists who number maybe 300.

The city of South Burlington, home to the airport, opposes the planes, mostly because of the noise.

Gov. Peter Shumlin and the state’s congressional delegation favor bringing the F-35 to Vermont.

If the 18-plane option for Vermont is chosen, considered most likely, the F-35 isn’t expected to bring new jobs to the area but it would guarantee about 1,100 well-paying jobs already here.