Clear
29°
Clear
Hi 54° | Lo 27°

Holiday Travelers Cast Wary Eye as Storm Moves Eastward

  • Departure boards display dozens of canceled flights in terminal D at Dallas-Fort Worth International airport, Monday, Nov. 25, 2013. Winter weather has caused travel disruptions throughout the area. (AP Photo/Brandon Wade)

    Departure boards display dozens of canceled flights in terminal D at Dallas-Fort Worth International airport, Monday, Nov. 25, 2013. Winter weather has caused travel disruptions throughout the area. (AP Photo/Brandon Wade)

  • Troy Peoples, center, and Amenia Evernz, right, pass the time watching TV after their flight to Washington state was delayed by two hours due to winter weather at Dallas-Fort Worth International airport, Monday, Nov. 25, 2013. Winter weather has caused travel disruptions throughout the area including the cancelation and delays of hundreds of flights. (AP Photo/Brandon Wade)

    Troy Peoples, center, and Amenia Evernz, right, pass the time watching TV after their flight to Washington state was delayed by two hours due to winter weather at Dallas-Fort Worth International airport, Monday, Nov. 25, 2013. Winter weather has caused travel disruptions throughout the area including the cancelation and delays of hundreds of flights. (AP Photo/Brandon Wade)

  • Crews spray deicing solution onto an American Airlines 737 before departure at Dallas-Fort Worth International airport, Monday, Nov. 25, 2013. Winter weather has caused travel disruptions throughout the area including the cancelation and delays of hundreds of flights. (AP Photo/Brandon Wade)

    Crews spray deicing solution onto an American Airlines 737 before departure at Dallas-Fort Worth International airport, Monday, Nov. 25, 2013. Winter weather has caused travel disruptions throughout the area including the cancelation and delays of hundreds of flights. (AP Photo/Brandon Wade)

  • David McCain of Abilene relaxes in the seats of the ticketing area for American airlines in Terminal C after his flight home to Abilene was canceled, as an arctic cold front begins to move into the North Texas area on Sunday, Nov. 24, 2013.  (AP Photo/Dallas Morning News, Louis DeLuca)

    David McCain of Abilene relaxes in the seats of the ticketing area for American airlines in Terminal C after his flight home to Abilene was canceled, as an arctic cold front begins to move into the North Texas area on Sunday, Nov. 24, 2013. (AP Photo/Dallas Morning News, Louis DeLuca)

  • Samantha Hernandez scrapes ice off of the windows after Kenneth Fields sprays them with a concoction of vinegar and water to soften the ice on Saturday, Nov. 23, 2013, in Odessa, Texas. The fierce weather has caused at least eight deaths and prompted advisories Saturday afternoon in New Mexico and Texas. (AP Photo/The Odessa American, Edyta Blaszczyk)

    Samantha Hernandez scrapes ice off of the windows after Kenneth Fields sprays them with a concoction of vinegar and water to soften the ice on Saturday, Nov. 23, 2013, in Odessa, Texas. The fierce weather has caused at least eight deaths and prompted advisories Saturday afternoon in New Mexico and Texas. (AP Photo/The Odessa American, Edyta Blaszczyk)

  • Workers with Duncan Tree Service remove a tree that fell Sunday on Jack Sullivan's Cutlass parked in the driveway of his Odessa, Texas home, on Monday, Nov. 25, 2013. Wintry weather with freezing rain, sleet and snow swept through much of West Texas over the weekend, causing power outages and many tree limbs to break under the weight of the ice. Conditions are forecast to improve during the next couple of days. (AP Photo/Odessa American, Mark Sterkel)

    Workers with Duncan Tree Service remove a tree that fell Sunday on Jack Sullivan's Cutlass parked in the driveway of his Odessa, Texas home, on Monday, Nov. 25, 2013. Wintry weather with freezing rain, sleet and snow swept through much of West Texas over the weekend, causing power outages and many tree limbs to break under the weight of the ice. Conditions are forecast to improve during the next couple of days. (AP Photo/Odessa American, Mark Sterkel)

  • Departure boards display dozens of canceled flights in terminal D at Dallas-Fort Worth International airport, Monday, Nov. 25, 2013. Winter weather has caused travel disruptions throughout the area. (AP Photo/Brandon Wade)
  • Troy Peoples, center, and Amenia Evernz, right, pass the time watching TV after their flight to Washington state was delayed by two hours due to winter weather at Dallas-Fort Worth International airport, Monday, Nov. 25, 2013. Winter weather has caused travel disruptions throughout the area including the cancelation and delays of hundreds of flights. (AP Photo/Brandon Wade)
  • Crews spray deicing solution onto an American Airlines 737 before departure at Dallas-Fort Worth International airport, Monday, Nov. 25, 2013. Winter weather has caused travel disruptions throughout the area including the cancelation and delays of hundreds of flights. (AP Photo/Brandon Wade)
  • David McCain of Abilene relaxes in the seats of the ticketing area for American airlines in Terminal C after his flight home to Abilene was canceled, as an arctic cold front begins to move into the North Texas area on Sunday, Nov. 24, 2013.  (AP Photo/Dallas Morning News, Louis DeLuca)
  • Samantha Hernandez scrapes ice off of the windows after Kenneth Fields sprays them with a concoction of vinegar and water to soften the ice on Saturday, Nov. 23, 2013, in Odessa, Texas. The fierce weather has caused at least eight deaths and prompted advisories Saturday afternoon in New Mexico and Texas. (AP Photo/The Odessa American, Edyta Blaszczyk)
  • Workers with Duncan Tree Service remove a tree that fell Sunday on Jack Sullivan's Cutlass parked in the driveway of his Odessa, Texas home, on Monday, Nov. 25, 2013. Wintry weather with freezing rain, sleet and snow swept through much of West Texas over the weekend, causing power outages and many tree limbs to break under the weight of the ice. Conditions are forecast to improve during the next couple of days. (AP Photo/Odessa American, Mark Sterkel)

Dallas — A winter storm system blamed for at least 11 fatal accidents in the West and Texas threatens to dampen the Thanksgiving holiday for millions of Americans traveling this week.

Nearly 300 American Airlines and American Eagle flights were canceled in and out of Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport on Monday due to the weather, spokeswoman Laura Masvidal said, mirroring disruptions at the air hub a day earlier. Some of the country’s busiest airports — New York, Washington D.C., Philadelphia, Boston and Charlotte, N.C. — could see big delays.

Icy roads led to hundreds of accidents and at least 11 deaths, half of them in Texas. On Monday, the storm brought a mix of snow, sleet and freezing rain to parts of Arkansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, southern Kansas and Texas. But as the storm continues east, there are fears of heavy rain along the busy Interstate 95 corridor and sleet, freezing rain and snow away from the coast and at higher elevations.

Tom Kines, a meteorologist with AccuWeather, said it will be “primarily a rain event” for the East Coast, with up to three inches of rain dousing travelers.

“The further inland you get — especially as you get into that higher terrain — you are going to deal with frozen precipitation,” Kines said. Snow could fall in western Pennsylvania and the interior of New England.

In the Upper Valley, temperatures are expected to climb into the high 30s today, when there is a chance of snow showers.

Heavy rain is expected to begin overnight, with flooding possible, and later Wednesday, high temperatures are expected to be well into the 40s as rain continues throughout the day.

On Thanksgiving, temperatures are expected to turn colder, with highs back down in the 20s.

Meanwhile, up to 9 inches could blanket northern parts of West Virginia, where the National Weather Service issued a winter storm warning from this morning through Wednesday afternoon.

Jeff Smidt is traveling Wednesday from his home in Toronto to visit his family in Andover, Mass., just outside Boston.

“My understanding is that I’m traveling at like the worst time ever,” he said.

Smidt tried to get on an earlier flight but JetBlue told him it isn’t waiving any change fees yet.

“I’m just hoping I also don’t become a statistic during the holiday weekend,” he said. “Worst comes to worst, it will be an eight-hour trek down Interstate 90.”

Ninety percent of travelers this week will drive, according to AAA, and an estimated 38.9 million people — 1.6 percent fewer than last year — are expected to drive 50 miles or more from their home.

Gas is about 15 cents cheaper than last year, AAA said Monday, with a gallon of regular selling for $3.28.

The car-lobbying group and travel agency says Wednesday will be the busiest travel day, a forecast based on a formula that factors in consumer confidence, stock market performance, unemployment and a survey of 418 people that has a 6 percent margin of error.

Air travel will be busier and more expensive than usual this Thanksgiving.

This holiday will likely see the most air travelers since 2007, according to Airlines for America, the industry’s trade and lobbying group, with the busiest day being Sunday, an estimated 2.56 million passengers. Wednesday is expected to be the second-busiest with 2.42 million passengers.

The average domestic airfare is up 9.5 percent from last Thanksgiving to $313, according to the Airlines Reporting Corp., which processes tickets sold online and by traditional travel agencies.

Meanwhile, Amtrak prices in September — the most recent month for which data is available — were up more than 4 percent from last year.

Adding to the usual stress of holiday travel, though, is the weather that’s ahead for much of the country. Already, the storm system dropped several inches of snow last week in New Mexico, Arizona, Oklahoma and West Texas.

Some of the worst weather was expected in the Ouachita Mountains of western Arkansas but most of the region saw only sporadic ice and very cold temperatures.

“You can see it on the power lines but the roads are fine,” said Courtney O’Neal-Walden, who planned to close her Dairyette restaurant in Mount Ida four hours early because business was slow.

In Texas, up to 44,000 people, mostly in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, were without power earlier in the day, but that number had dropped considerably by the afternoon.

———

Mayerowitz reported from New York City. Associated Press writers John Raby in Charleston, W.Va., Diana Heidgerd in Dallas and Kelly P. Kissel and Jill Zeman in Little Rock contributed to this report.