Colo. Crews Hold On

  • Evacuess and fire officials listen to a news briefing on the Black Forest Fire in Colorado Springs, Colo., Friday, June 14, 2013. Little more than 36 hours after it started in the Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, the blaze surpassed last June's Waldo Canyon fire as the most destructive in state history. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

    Evacuess and fire officials listen to a news briefing on the Black Forest Fire in Colorado Springs, Colo., Friday, June 14, 2013. Little more than 36 hours after it started in the Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, the blaze surpassed last June's Waldo Canyon fire as the most destructive in state history. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

  • Incident Commander Rich Harvey, center, gives an update on the Black Forest Fire, to resident Dan Brennan, bottom right, during a press briefing in Colorado Springs, Colo., Friday, June 14, 2013.  Firefighters held the line Friday on the Black Forest Fire, in which two people were killed as they tried to escape and 379 homes were destroyed. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

    Incident Commander Rich Harvey, center, gives an update on the Black Forest Fire, to resident Dan Brennan, bottom right, during a press briefing in Colorado Springs, Colo., Friday, June 14, 2013. Firefighters held the line Friday on the Black Forest Fire, in which two people were killed as they tried to escape and 379 homes were destroyed. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

  • Nancy Bradley, right, a resident of Black Forest, Colo., hugs fellow evacuee Jenny Abernathy, second from right, as Rebecca Abernathy, third from right, Jenny's daughter, watches while listening to an update on the Black Forest Fire in Colorado Springs, Colo., Friday, June 14, 2013. Firefighters held the line Friday on the Black Forest Fire, in which two people were killed as they tried to escape and 379 homes were destroyed. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

    Nancy Bradley, right, a resident of Black Forest, Colo., hugs fellow evacuee Jenny Abernathy, second from right, as Rebecca Abernathy, third from right, Jenny's daughter, watches while listening to an update on the Black Forest Fire in Colorado Springs, Colo., Friday, June 14, 2013. Firefighters held the line Friday on the Black Forest Fire, in which two people were killed as they tried to escape and 379 homes were destroyed. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

  • Karen Hilborn and her son Alex wait to head into the Black Forest fire burn zone with a police escort to gather items from their home Friday, June 14, 2013 near Colorado Springs, Colo. The Hilborn's home was spared but approximately 40 other structures on Holmes Road burned to the ground.  Little more than 36 hours after it started in the Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, the blaze surpassed last June's Waldo Canyon fire as the most destructive in state history. That blaze burned 347 homes and killed two people.  Bradley thinks her home escaped the fire.  (AP Photo/The Gazette, Michael Ciaglo)

    Karen Hilborn and her son Alex wait to head into the Black Forest fire burn zone with a police escort to gather items from their home Friday, June 14, 2013 near Colorado Springs, Colo. The Hilborn's home was spared but approximately 40 other structures on Holmes Road burned to the ground. Little more than 36 hours after it started in the Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, the blaze surpassed last June's Waldo Canyon fire as the most destructive in state history. That blaze burned 347 homes and killed two people. Bradley thinks her home escaped the fire. (AP Photo/The Gazette, Michael Ciaglo)

  • A police officer helps manage escorts into the burn zone for residents to retrieve animals and medication at a roadblock on Friday, June 14, 2013 near Colorado Springs, Colo.  Little more than 36 hours after it started in the Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, the blaze surpassed last June's Waldo Canyon fire as the most destructive in state history. That blaze burned 347 homes and killed two people.  Bradley thinks her home escaped the fire.  (AP Photo/The Gazette, Michael Ciaglo)

    A police officer helps manage escorts into the burn zone for residents to retrieve animals and medication at a roadblock on Friday, June 14, 2013 near Colorado Springs, Colo. Little more than 36 hours after it started in the Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, the blaze surpassed last June's Waldo Canyon fire as the most destructive in state history. That blaze burned 347 homes and killed two people. Bradley thinks her home escaped the fire. (AP Photo/The Gazette, Michael Ciaglo)

  • Ray Miller, left, hugs his wife Cindy before he heads into the burn zone with a police escort Friday, June 14, 2013 to try to retrieve medication from their home that was burned to the ground in the Black Forest fire near Colorado Springs, Colo.  Little more than 36 hours after it started in the Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, the blaze surpassed last June's Waldo Canyon fire as the most destructive in state history. That blaze burned 347 homes and killed two people.  Bradley thinks her home escaped the fire.  (AP Photo/The Gazette, Michael Ciaglo)

    Ray Miller, left, hugs his wife Cindy before he heads into the burn zone with a police escort Friday, June 14, 2013 to try to retrieve medication from their home that was burned to the ground in the Black Forest fire near Colorado Springs, Colo. Little more than 36 hours after it started in the Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, the blaze surpassed last June's Waldo Canyon fire as the most destructive in state history. That blaze burned 347 homes and killed two people. Bradley thinks her home escaped the fire. (AP Photo/The Gazette, Michael Ciaglo)

  • Sherri Kaderka looks in her bag at the American Red Cross shelter in Monument, Colo., for evacuees from the nearby Black Forest wildfire on Friday, June 14, 2013. Nearly 4,000 people are still evacuated from the fire that broke out on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

    Sherri Kaderka looks in her bag at the American Red Cross shelter in Monument, Colo., for evacuees from the nearby Black Forest wildfire on Friday, June 14, 2013. Nearly 4,000 people are still evacuated from the fire that broke out on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

  • Incident Commander Rich Harvey gives an update on the Black Forest Fire during a news briefing in Colorado Springs, Colo., Friday, June 14, 2013. Little more than 36 hours after it started in the Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, the blaze surpassed last June's Waldo Canyon fire as the most destructive in state history. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

    Incident Commander Rich Harvey gives an update on the Black Forest Fire during a news briefing in Colorado Springs, Colo., Friday, June 14, 2013. Little more than 36 hours after it started in the Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, the blaze surpassed last June's Waldo Canyon fire as the most destructive in state history. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

  • A sign at the Academy Christian Church thanks firefighters for their efforts in the outskirts of the Black Forest Fire in Colorado Springs, Colo., Friday, June 14,  2013. Little more than 36 hours after it started in the Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, the blaze surpassed last June's Waldo Canyon fire as the most destructive in state history. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

    A sign at the Academy Christian Church thanks firefighters for their efforts in the outskirts of the Black Forest Fire in Colorado Springs, Colo., Friday, June 14, 2013. Little more than 36 hours after it started in the Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, the blaze surpassed last June's Waldo Canyon fire as the most destructive in state history. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

  • Incident Commander Rich Harvey gives an update on the Black Forest Fire during a news briefing in Colorado Springs, Colo., Friday, June 14, 2013. Little more than 36 hours after it started in the Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, the blaze surpassed last June's Waldo Canyon fire as the most destructive in state history. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

    Incident Commander Rich Harvey gives an update on the Black Forest Fire during a news briefing in Colorado Springs, Colo., Friday, June 14, 2013. Little more than 36 hours after it started in the Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, the blaze surpassed last June's Waldo Canyon fire as the most destructive in state history. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

  • Evacuess and fire officials listen to a news briefing on the Black Forest Fire in Colorado Springs, Colo., Friday, June 14, 2013. Little more than 36 hours after it started in the Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, the blaze surpassed last June's Waldo Canyon fire as the most destructive in state history. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
  • Incident Commander Rich Harvey, center, gives an update on the Black Forest Fire, to resident Dan Brennan, bottom right, during a press briefing in Colorado Springs, Colo., Friday, June 14, 2013.  Firefighters held the line Friday on the Black Forest Fire, in which two people were killed as they tried to escape and 379 homes were destroyed. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
  • Nancy Bradley, right, a resident of Black Forest, Colo., hugs fellow evacuee Jenny Abernathy, second from right, as Rebecca Abernathy, third from right, Jenny's daughter, watches while listening to an update on the Black Forest Fire in Colorado Springs, Colo., Friday, June 14, 2013. Firefighters held the line Friday on the Black Forest Fire, in which two people were killed as they tried to escape and 379 homes were destroyed. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
  • Karen Hilborn and her son Alex wait to head into the Black Forest fire burn zone with a police escort to gather items from their home Friday, June 14, 2013 near Colorado Springs, Colo. The Hilborn's home was spared but approximately 40 other structures on Holmes Road burned to the ground.  Little more than 36 hours after it started in the Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, the blaze surpassed last June's Waldo Canyon fire as the most destructive in state history. That blaze burned 347 homes and killed two people.  Bradley thinks her home escaped the fire.  (AP Photo/The Gazette, Michael Ciaglo)
  • A police officer helps manage escorts into the burn zone for residents to retrieve animals and medication at a roadblock on Friday, June 14, 2013 near Colorado Springs, Colo.  Little more than 36 hours after it started in the Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, the blaze surpassed last June's Waldo Canyon fire as the most destructive in state history. That blaze burned 347 homes and killed two people.  Bradley thinks her home escaped the fire.  (AP Photo/The Gazette, Michael Ciaglo)
  • Ray Miller, left, hugs his wife Cindy before he heads into the burn zone with a police escort Friday, June 14, 2013 to try to retrieve medication from their home that was burned to the ground in the Black Forest fire near Colorado Springs, Colo.  Little more than 36 hours after it started in the Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, the blaze surpassed last June's Waldo Canyon fire as the most destructive in state history. That blaze burned 347 homes and killed two people.  Bradley thinks her home escaped the fire.  (AP Photo/The Gazette, Michael Ciaglo)
  • Sherri Kaderka looks in her bag at the American Red Cross shelter in Monument, Colo., for evacuees from the nearby Black Forest wildfire on Friday, June 14, 2013. Nearly 4,000 people are still evacuated from the fire that broke out on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)
  • Incident Commander Rich Harvey gives an update on the Black Forest Fire during a news briefing in Colorado Springs, Colo., Friday, June 14, 2013. Little more than 36 hours after it started in the Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, the blaze surpassed last June's Waldo Canyon fire as the most destructive in state history. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
  • A sign at the Academy Christian Church thanks firefighters for their efforts in the outskirts of the Black Forest Fire in Colorado Springs, Colo., Friday, June 14,  2013. Little more than 36 hours after it started in the Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, the blaze surpassed last June's Waldo Canyon fire as the most destructive in state history. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
  • Incident Commander Rich Harvey gives an update on the Black Forest Fire during a news briefing in Colorado Springs, Colo., Friday, June 14, 2013. Little more than 36 hours after it started in the Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, the blaze surpassed last June's Waldo Canyon fire as the most destructive in state history. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Colorado Springs, Colo. — Authorities lifted evacuations in a wide swath of terrain outside Colorado Springs yesterday as they said a surprise rain shower helped them expand containment of a wildfire that has destroyed 400 homes.

Just one day after clearing out the Flying Horse neighborhood in northern Colorado Springs, officials allowed people back into at least 1,000 houses. They also re-opened an eastern swath of the nearby Black Forest area in El Paso County.

Incident Commander Rich Harvey said the Black Forest Fire — the most destructive in Colorado history — is now 30 percent contained. It was only 5 percent contained Thursday.

The fire, in which two people died while apparently trying to escape their home, began Tuesday during record-setting heat and tinder-dry conditions. Officials warned it still could flare up again if the weather shifts.

Crews say they were better prepared to take on the flames because of lessons learned fighting last year’s Waldo Canyon Fire, a similarly devastating blaze that devoured hundreds of homes and killed two people only a few miles away.

When the Black Forest, a thickly wooded rural region north of Colorado Springs, began to burn, authorities swiftly evacuated tens of thousands of people from an area larger than the Denver metropolitan area.