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Childhood Obesity Rate Falls Sharply

CDC Reports 40% Decline In Young Kids in Past Decade

Washington — New federal data published Tuesday show a 43 percent drop in the obesity rate among children ages 2 to 5 during the past decade, providing another encouraging sign in the fight against one of the country’s leading public-health problems, officials said.

The finding comes from a government study considered a gold standard to measure public-health trends. Researchers found that just over 8 percent of children 2 to 5 were obese in 2011-2012, down from nearly 14 percent in 2003-2004. Although the drop was significant, federal health officials noted that obesity rates for the broader population remain unchanged, and for women older than 60, it rose about 21 percent during that period.

The report, published online Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association, comes on the heels of data released last year by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that found that the obesity rate among low-income preschoolers participating in federal nutrition programs declined broadly from 2008 to 2011 after rising for decades.

Cynthia Ogden, a CDC epidemiologist and lead author of the most recent study, said that the data offer good news in at least one age group.

“We see hope in young kids,” she said.

The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey tracks obesity data by measuring height and weight. The data are released every two years.

CDC officials said that last year’s data represented the largest and most comprehensive report of declining obesity rates in poor children. Nineteen states and U.S. territories had a lower percentage of obese children ages 2 to 4.

“We continue to see signs that, for some children in this country, the scales are tipping,” CDC Director Tom Frieden said.Federal researchers have also seen encouraging signs from communities across the country with obesity-prevention programs, including Anchorage, Philadelphia, New York City and King County, Wash.

“This confirms that at least for kids, we can turn the tide and begin to reverse the obesity epidemic,” CDC Director Tom Frieden said.

Researchers said that they don’t know the precise reasons behind the dropfor children 2 to 5. But they noted that many child-care centers have started to improve nutrition and physical activity standards.

Ogden said that CDC data also show decreases in consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages among youth.

Another possible factor is improvement in breastfeeding rates in the United States, which helps fight obesity in breastfed children.

In a statement, first lady Michelle Obama praised the progress in lowering obesity rates among young children and said that participation in her Let’s Move! program was encouraging healthier habits.

A child is considered obese if his or her body mass index, calculated using weight and height, is at or above the 95th percentile for children of the same age and sex, according to CDC growth charts. About 17 percent of youth 2 to 19 and 35 percent of adults are considered obese.