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A Student Museum at Hartford Middle

  • Hartford Middle School teacher Nicole Bonnett helps Brady Hathorn, 11, middle, and Deacon Malia. 11, right, through a glitch in their presentation on how "Apple Changed the World" during their learning museum program in White River Junction Thursday, December 5, 2013.<br/>(Valley News - James M. Patterson)

    Hartford Middle School teacher Nicole Bonnett helps Brady Hathorn, 11, middle, and Deacon Malia. 11, right, through a glitch in their presentation on how "Apple Changed the World" during their learning museum program in White River Junction Thursday, December 5, 2013.
    (Valley News - James M. Patterson) Purchase photo reprints »

  • As guests enter through the cell membrane into an exhibit on cells and genes in Hartford Middle School Team Altitude's learning museum, eighth grader Beth Robbins, 13, explains the functions of the membrane. Students from the integrated learning team created the museum last Thurday to show their parents what they have learned since the start of the school year, December 5, 2013.<br/>(Valley News - James M. Patterson)

    As guests enter through the cell membrane into an exhibit on cells and genes in Hartford Middle School Team Altitude's learning museum, eighth grader Beth Robbins, 13, explains the functions of the membrane. Students from the integrated learning team created the museum last Thurday to show their parents what they have learned since the start of the school year, December 5, 2013.
    (Valley News - James M. Patterson) Purchase photo reprints »

  • Helm Toler, 11, gives Laurie Hausler, the mother of another student, a detailed lecture on the progressing symptoms of bubonic plague, ultimately leading to death, during the Altitude Team's learning museum at  Hartford Middle School Thursday, December 5, 2013.<br/>(Valley News - James M. Patterson)

    Helm Toler, 11, gives Laurie Hausler, the mother of another student, a detailed lecture on the progressing symptoms of bubonic plague, ultimately leading to death, during the Altitude Team's learning museum at Hartford Middle School Thursday, December 5, 2013.
    (Valley News - James M. Patterson) Purchase photo reprints »

  • Hartford Middle School teacher Nicole Bonnett helps Brady Hathorn, 11, middle, and Deacon Malia. 11, right, through a glitch in their presentation on how "Apple Changed the World" during their learning museum program in White River Junction Thursday, December 5, 2013.<br/>(Valley News - James M. Patterson)
  • As guests enter through the cell membrane into an exhibit on cells and genes in Hartford Middle School Team Altitude's learning museum, eighth grader Beth Robbins, 13, explains the functions of the membrane. Students from the integrated learning team created the museum last Thurday to show their parents what they have learned since the start of the school year, December 5, 2013.<br/>(Valley News - James M. Patterson)
  • Helm Toler, 11, gives Laurie Hausler, the mother of another student, a detailed lecture on the progressing symptoms of bubonic plague, ultimately leading to death, during the Altitude Team's learning museum at  Hartford Middle School Thursday, December 5, 2013.<br/>(Valley News - James M. Patterson)

Team Altitude, a multi-age group of students at Hartford Memorial Middle School, just finished a “theme” or unit on the subject of individuality, and as they have been doing for the past two years, they presented their work to the community.

On Thursday evening, the team set up The Altitude Museum of Science and Society, where students presented subjects as diverse as The Black Death, Apple computers, women’s rights and mitosis, better known as cell division.

The team comprises students from grades six, seven and eight and is the only multi-age group in the school, said Nicole Bonnett, one of the team’s four teachers. The team’s 75 students follow an innovative integrated curriculum that combines science, language arts and social studies in the same teaching block. The museum is one of three such “culminating events” each school year, events that give parents an opportunity to come into the school and see what students have been learning.

— Alex Hanson