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Forum, April 11: Not Turning the Other Cheek


Tuesday, April 10, 2018
Not Turning the Other Cheek

Politicians can support or reject norms, and Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt, the authors of How Democracies Die, claim the GOP has consistently favored party over nation for the last quarter century. I truly regard the current administration as the GOP’s culmination of toxicity, and have called them out during rallies, in letters to editors and on CATV.

A recent edition of the Valley News published Albert Hunt’s column “2 Mistakes Democrats Can’t Afford to Make” (April 4). In it, he advises liberals not to take cheap shots at our rivals. Levitsky and Ziblatt say tolerance (and respect) for one’s rivals is one of the norms no longer practiced by politicians. Maybe I’ve no talent for diplomacy, but to me forbearance smacks of lacking the passion one should feel toward an aggressor. Further, if I turn the other cheek, wouldn’t my adversaries pummel that side too?

If it wasn’t for the “March For Your Life” I’d start a new one as an ex-pat. But wasn’t it a rude awakening when we heard the news that some right-wingers were distributing free gun magazines on the lawn of the Vermont Statehouse? Personally, I’d prefer to repeal the Second Amendment and tell the gun hobbyists to take it or leave. Let’s be real: Today’s high school seniors will be voting this November. You think they’re going to forget the power they demonstrated in the streets across our nation? I’ll stick around till the 2018 votes are counted; maybe the “Gingrich Revolution” will have run it’s course by then. Else we, and two more high school graduating classes, will be waiting for 2020.

Kevin McEvoy Leveret

White River Junction

Trump Threatens Financial Stability

President Donald Trump has now engaged us in a tariff war — a war he claims is “easy to win.” Win or lose, the end result will be at the expense of the millions of Americans who rely on stable financial markets to save and invest for their retirements, education and financial well-being. It is clear that he is anything but stable.

Bill Crowther

Canaan

Love Is the Lifeblood

In these post-Donald Trump election days, it seems to be increasingly evident that lies and  turmoil are at the top of his agenda. Love of country and fellow human beings seems nonexistent in his theater, which is tearing down the brilliant and just governance set in place by our forefathers.

Because of this, now more than ever, it is imperative that the rest of us look at helping one another as top-priority behavior. It takes so little for each to stand strong daily and do something that can begin to repair the torn edges of the fabric of our society. Lock arms and voices to help the struggling poor, the underpriviledged and DACA recipients who have pledged American  allegiance by their works and words. Never forget that circumstances beyond our control could without warning plunge any one of us into the depths of despair. Acts of kindness and love give hope, which is the lifeblood that keeps humanity and our great country alive and strong.

Jackie Smith

Sunapee

Fight Fire With Fire

Finally, a New Hampshire senator speaks the truth about protecting the students in our schools (“Preventing Massacres in New Hampshire’s Schools,” April 6).

I currently work in a school and, as a former corrections officer, it is our duty to protect the young in our schools. Gun control is not the answer. As Sen. Bob Giuda states in his op-ed column, we must have a means to effectively stop the killer. A huge part of the problem is mental health. And yes, schools are wide open to these “massacres” because these people know they are “gun free.”

In my opinion, having trained personal in a school setting may deter some of these people from going to another school and killing more students. At least deadly force will be met with deadly force.

Steve Page

North Haverhill

Missing MLK Acknowledgement

On April 4, the only acknowledgment anywhere in the paper of what happened 50 years earlier was in the Dennis the Menace cartoon.

Eric Miller

Norwich

‘Laramie Project’ Comes to Claremont

As a cast member of Amplified Arts and Rural Outright’s upcoming production of The Laramie Project, I am writing to invite our community to experience this incredibly powerful theatrical piece.

The production will open on April 27, at 6:30 p.m., and will have an additional two shows on April 28, at 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m., at Amplified Arts, on the second floor of 31 Pleasant St., in Claremont.

Following each show will be a panel discussion. It is not a required part of the show, but I highly recommend it.

The Laramie Project, by Moises Kaufman and the members of the Tectonic Theater Company, is documentary-like in style. It recounts the interviews and testimonies of the people of Laramie, Wyo., as well as the journal entries of the Tectonic players, in the aftermath of the beating and death of Matthew Shepard in 1998. The play is not only important, but extremely timely as well. Our entire cast has put a tremendous amount of effort into this show, and by the opening we will have put in more than 80 hours of rehearsal time. On behalf of the entire cast, I hope that you will join us on the weekend of April 27.

For more information and to purchase tickets, visit amplefiedartsnh.com.

Azalea Hudson

Claremont